angle of attack?

Discussion in '<a href=http://www.plowsite.com target=_blank ?>Sn' started by tru cut, Mar 27, 2000.

  1. tru cut

    tru cut LawnSite Member
    Posts: 103

    I picked up a boucher from henderson mfg.when i went to the show in concord.On there snowfoe 111 plow you can change the angle of attack from 5 to 10 or20 degreas what is the benafit to this.Ihave not seen this on any other plow,is there any that do?does anyone know the angle of attack of thier plow? Has anyone ever used a henderson<p>----------<br>Todd <br>
     
  2. plowking35

    plowking35 LawnSite Bronze Member
    from S.E. CT
    Posts: 1,687

    The degree of attack angle wil be most noticable on hard pack. The benifit is that the more attack angle you have, the less proficient at cutting hard pack the will be. That is why fisher plows dont do very well in packed snow. they move fluffy snow fine, so a less aggressive angle of attack is easier on the plow and truck in powder situations. Also the angle of attack will to some degree effect the way the plow throws snow. I have found that western throws snow better than a fisher, the western has a much lower attack angle(meaning the blade is more vertical)<br>Now the meyer has about the same angle of attack that the western does, but doesnt throw as well, and I thnk that is due to the curve of the moldboard, which may explain why the diamond with the mega curve but steep attack angle throws well also.<br>I can see the benifits of a mutiposition attack angle, depending on conditions you can adjust the plow to be its most effective. <br>I didnt get a broushure so I am not sure how the attack angle is moved, but seeing how the rest of the plow was made, it is a very sturdy piece. Only problem is, you need a 15000 gvw and up truck to push it.<br>Dino <p>----------<br> Professional Ice and Snow Management <br>Products:Services:Equipment www.sima.org
     
  3. GeoffDiamond

    GeoffDiamond LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 1,651

    I am not sure if this is what you guys are talking about or not. Anyways if you are talking about the angle the a-frame is to the ground in relation to the blade i might have some good information about Diamond.<p>On the Diamond push fram on the truck, there are 3 holes for the blade's a-frame to attach to ( this is on fisher too, even the minute-mounts, but it's hard to change the angle without quick pins). Anyways when the ground is frozen or we need good to scrape hard pack. I have the guys put the blade in the top hole, this puts the blade at a downward angle, so it wants to dig into the snow, lawn, gravel, or anything else unfrozen. <p>In the start of the reason, most truck use the middle hole, the blade is about level scrapes well but not as good as the top hole. Some trucks use the bottom hole, the drivers make the call, based on their route.<p>This way lawn and gravel aren't dug up as much. The middle of the season when everything is frozen, all trucks run with their blades in the top hole, which works very well. <p>In the spring like the two storms we had in march where everything was unfrozen. I think almost every truck ran their blades in the bottom hole. Here the cutting edge still makes contact with the ground, but less of a downard force is applied to the blade, so less damage is done to unfrozen surfaces.<p>I think Diamond is the only plow company that allows you to change the angle of the a-frame with quick pins. I know it can be done with a fisher but isn't easy. <p>Geoff
     
  4. thelawnguy

    thelawnguy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,412

    Im a little confused. Putting the pin in the top hole would lower the a-frame, and tilt the blade backwards, correct? And putting it in the bottom hole would raise it and tilt the blade forward. Im using the Fisher as example, where the three holes are on the blade a-frame not the head frame.<p>Just want to be sure Im on the same page here.<p>Bill
     
  5. plowking35

    plowking35 LawnSite Bronze Member
    from S.E. CT
    Posts: 1,687

    Geoff I have to disagree with you on the Fisher anyway(have not seen enough diamonds to have an opinion) but in order to get the same angle of attack that the meyer or western does the fisher would need the a frame attached near the hood. The trip edge is angled so far forward that the 3 position holes do very little to help. My opionion is that they were put there only to prolong the life of the spring keepers mounted on the trip edge. I will have to look at my 7.5 fisher boat anchor and see what degree of forward pitch it has and get back to the forum board with what I find.<br>Dino <p>----------<br> Professional Ice and Snow Management <br>Products:Services:Equipment www.sima.org
     
  6. GeoffDiamond

    GeoffDiamond LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 1,651

    Ok maybe i am wrong on this one, not the first or last time. I am confused a little myself, because i know useing the top hole puts the blade at a better cutting angle. <p>Are you guys talking about how the trip edge angle changes the cutting ability?<p>Geoff
     
  7. plowking35

    plowking35 LawnSite Bronze Member
    from S.E. CT
    Posts: 1,687

    Well the original discussion was about how the Henderson plow was able to change the angle of attack on the cutting edge. And you correctly replied that with the diamond/fisher that with the 3 position holes on the a frame you can do the same, and probably move about 10-15 degrees total between top and bottom holes.<br>However when the a frame is sitting level to the gound, the fisher and I believe diamond trip edge itself have a 30 degree or so front angle to them,whereas the meyer and western and most other full trip plows will have a 5-10 degree forward angle.<br>Now I believe that the trip edge plows nned to do this, otherwise they would trip all the time, and the opposite for the full trip plows. Meaning that if the edge was at a 30degree forward angle on a full trip plow it may never trip.<br>So that being the case in my opinion the amount of attack angle that one is able to adjust on the fisher/diamond in negligable.<br>Whereas on a full trip plow the difference of even a few degrees will have a mojor impact on how it operates.<br>Any other ideas out there?<br>Dino <p>----------<br> Professional Ice and Snow Management <br>Products:Services:Equipment www.sima.org
     
  8. GeoffDiamond

    GeoffDiamond LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 1,651

    I think ya hit the nail on the head, with that reply Dino. Changing the pin holes does have a major impact on cutting ability, if you have never done try it. The bottom hole saves a lot of lawn damage in the spring.<p>Geoff
     
  9. DaveO

    DaveO LawnSite Member
    Posts: 238

    Geoff is right. Changing the position on the A frame effects the angle of the edge. I'm not sure if this was Fisher's intended use. I believe it was done to compensate for different heights of truck chassis. But it works great for changing the angle. And like Geoff stated, the lower position is best in the warm weather..<p>Dave
     
  10. tru cut

    tru cut LawnSite Member
    Posts: 103

    dino,<br> do you know if the fisher v and the weastern v have the same angle?<p>----------<br>Todd <br>
     

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