Another Routine Leak

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by PurpHaze, Aug 31, 2007.

  1. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    We were originally given permission to miss a required "inservice training" day on etics and other BS and work on the site where the main line and wiring was rerouted because there would be no students. Then we found out yesterday afternoon that the site's water was going to be off today via the purveyor doing some repairs so that botched up all our plans.

    I was just going to take the entire day off but we ended up going out to another site where we had a main line leak right next to a blacktop play area. These are a PITA to work on when kids are at school because we spend more time watching our backs instead of doing our work.

    Anyway... it turned out to be an easy repair in the same area where we'd done a 90/90 repair about two years ago. Fortunately it was not our repair work that gave rather an original 90 ell. We think it cracked from asphalt paving equipment over the summer. Although it wasn't very deep we used the backhoe anyway which really sped things up. Since the line fed old QCVs that are no longer necessary since the area has been automated we just capped off the line at the tee, waited thirty minutes and then turned the backflow back on.

    Royal Oaks QCV Line Leak Repair 8-31-07 IV-01.jpg

    Royal Oaks QCV Line Leak Repair 8-31-07 IV-02.jpg
     
  2. I noticed you capped both lines. Don't see glue on the other though. I've often wondered on the pros and cons of capping abandoned lines. Usually don't so that I can run water backwards to find the original cutoff point. (I've had to do that a couple of times in 27 years)
     
  3. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    You are correct... there's no glue on the cap on the right side. I usually don't cap off abandoned lines for the same reason. However, we had quite a bit of water keep trickling out of it and I wanted to get things backfilled ASAP without more water making things mushier.

    Often we "temporarily abandon" a complete zone so portables can be set for a limited time period on asphalt pads. Usually they want the sprinklers capped so they can remove the grass for the asphalt but we just unscrew them and leave the swing joints open down below. Much easier to find things after the building's removed and we have to put the zone back together. We just turn on the valve and wait for the wet spots to appear. :)
     
  4. lawnscapesLLC

    lawnscapesLLC LawnSite Member
    Posts: 113

    ok i have a (probably) stupid question. if there was no problem with the first line why are there so many 90's instead of just one 90 down to the tee? I don't do irrigation but i'm a commercial new construction plumber so in my world that many 90's would cause not only a water pressure drop but would be a waste of money on fittings. What is the reason all the fittings? thanks!
     
  5. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,794

    New Construction Only Plumber?

    If you did any sort of maintenance or renovation you would immediately understand the 90's :)
     
  6. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    The original repair was hand dug with a shovel and was quite wet at the time. If I remember correctly the leak before was just past the original 90 that looks up. Not enough room to put on a compression coupler so the next easiest repair was the 90/90 reroute. Sure, there's pressure loss but not very much with a 2" line and the 90s. Even at that time I suspected the line went to the old Quick Coupling Valves that weren't being used any longer.

    I probably could of spent more time on the original leak and just replaced the original 90 by using a couple of slip couplings or bell ends but as wet as it was I wasn't about to spend extra time digging up the slop. :)
     
  7. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    I'm curious what the lines are doing at different depths to begin with. :) Looks like the top line is pretty dang shallow.
     
  8. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    Funny... I remarked on this to my partner... as to why the tee wasn't put in sideways and the line kept deep. It was originally installed by... um... plumbers. :)
     
  9. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    And we all appreciate that plumbers know best. :hammerhead:
     
  10. lawnscapesLLC

    lawnscapesLLC LawnSite Member
    Posts: 113

    Dirty water--i also did alot of maint, renovations etc and never had to use so many fittings, they make slip/repair couplings and such for that and i never had to use so many fittings, I was just not sure if there was a reason for it with irrigation or not.
     

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