Any issues with state??

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by kyle39, Apr 13, 2008.

  1. kyle39

    kyle39 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 33

    Is anyone having any problems with state. Concerning tea spraying. My concern is they will think you are spraying pesticides. Im being overly cautious im sure.

    Just started a lawn and landscape company. I am 100 % organic.
    Love the idea of compost tea. I have made it for home use. Using my own worm castings. This stuff works wonders.

    I appreciate evryone who posts here. Learning a ton.:)

    :)
     
  2. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    Here are the folks that control fert/pest licensing, they also provide enforcement in the field. I would call them and ask. They are going to ask you what is the "service" that the customer is paying for? If you state disease suppression they will consider it a pesticide application and you will have to comply with the law.

    It is all about what you "state" that you are doing or what you sell the service as. It is important for you and your customers to not to overstate the program.

    Is (compost teas) it part of your lawn care program? I would state that. Have you had great success with it? I would state that. I would not state that it fertilizes or has some pesticide attributes, because you can't prove it. Does it increase the beneficial microoganisms in the soil? I would state that.

    That is exactly what you are trying to do with the application of compost tea, manipulate the microoganisms in the soil to an aerobic group because it has shown, in your practices, to be beneficial. How beneficial? your customers have chemical free lawns with lush green stands of turf. Period


    IOWA
    *Terry Jensen Phone: 515-281-8599
    Bureau Chief FAX 515 281-4185
    Feed & Fertilizer Bureau
    Wallace Bldg.,502E 9th St. E-Mail: terry.jensen@idals.state.ia.us
    IA Dept. of Ag. & Land Stew. Website: www.agriculture.state.ia.us
    Des Moines, IA 50319-0051

    Travis Knight Phone: 515 725-1478
    Laboratory Bureau Chief FAX 515 725-1462
    Ankeny Laboratory Facility
    2230 S Ankeny E-Mail: travis.knight@idals.state.ia.us
    IA Dept. of Ag & Land Stew.
    Des Moines, IA 50023-9093

    Lori Smith Phone: 515 242-6338
    Program Assistant FAX 515 281-4185
    Feed & Fertilizer Bureau
    Wallace Bldg.,502E 9th St. E-Mail: lori.smith@idals.state.ia.us
    IA Dept. of Ag. & Land Stew.
    Des Moines, IA 50319-0051

    John Whipple Phone: 515 281-8610
    Director FAX 515 281-4185
    Plant Mgt. & Tech Div.
    Wallace Bldg.,502E 9th St. E-Mail: john.whipple@idals.state.ia.us
    IA Dept. of Ag. & Land Stew.
    Des Moines, IA 50319-0051
     
  3. kyle39

    kyle39 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 33

    Thankyou so much Bill. What an awsome response.

    I will check it out and let you know.

    Kyle
     
  4. Organic a go go

    Organic a go go LawnSite Member
    Posts: 211

    Bill Im assuming the wording on your box label that says "Part of a well balanced soil fertilility program" or whatever it says exactly is sort of a catch all CYA?? Smart. Probably'll save applicators like me a lot of 'splainin somewhere down the line and makes your life easier too. Kinda reminds me of the old "part of this well balanced breakfast" thing from cereal commercials.
    :)
     
  5. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    1-2-3 Instant Compost Tea is registered as a fertilizer in Illinois. So no problems mon. You can say it is part of your fertilizer treatment to anyone and everyone.

    You can also sell the application as an organic fetilizer treatment, the NPK comes from natural sources, fish, kelp, humates

    Brewed and extracted teas cannot claim to fertilize anything, they are considered soil amendments
     
  6. Organic a go go

    Organic a go go LawnSite Member
    Posts: 211

    Gotcha. I wont however be making any fungicidal claims even when the fungal tea comes out.......
     
  7. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    I just reread my post (#2) and do not mean to be misleading in any way, it seems to me I was.
    If you "claim" you are fertilizing and charging for fertilizing you must use a state licensed fertilizer to do that. You will be breaking the law if you don't

    I know it is splitting hairs but I need to make sure I am not misleading anyone. Our Instant Compost Tea is registered as a fertilizer in almost every state, except Oregon which considers it a soil amendment. Long story

    brewed and extracted compost tea's do not have NPK's to get lab reports to come back and say they are considered a fertilizer when in fact they have the nutrients and the biology that supplies the NPK and micro nutrients to the turf to satisfy the turfs needs.

    It's just that we are talking about different types of NPK, compost teas supply non leechable, not plant available forms. Who makes them plant available, the beneficial microorganisms.
     
  8. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    Go Go, funny you mention that
    I have been on the phone/emails with the EPA today and have another conference call tomorrow, you may be able to make all of the claims you want.

    On the fungal and the NPP product, it seems both have exceptions with the EPA already, we are just trying to clarify. It is a long process, 7 months and counting
     
  9. Organic a go go

    Organic a go go LawnSite Member
    Posts: 211

    That'd obviously be great Bill!! Maybe getting ahead of the game here but will your product make claims in regards to specific diseases or something more generalized?
     
  10. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    For one product 1-2-3 NPP we would use the verbiage right from the EPA

    "As a PGR, NPP’s mode of action is characterized by its ability to bolster plant resistance against fungal diseases. Specifically, it purports protection against downy mildew, powdery mildew, early blight, late blight, gray mold, leaf spot, anthracnose and blast.
    NPP is used for controlling soil nematodes on crops (food and non-food), ornamentals and turf.
    Mode of action: NPP acts in soil to stimulate the growth of naturally occurring microorganisms in the soil, which then release substances that kill pathogenic nematodes and their eggs."
     

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