Any one have a good formula?

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by McKeeLand, Apr 5, 2007.

  1. McKeeLand

    McKeeLand LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 681

    I was wondering if anyone had linear foot per hour formula for cutting borders? i have an estimate to replace the existing border on a drive and extend it out further. i was going to install a double border to give him more room on the drive. maybe a sailor and soldier course. i am terrible at tracking our hours on tasks, i should know this by now.
     
  2. ChampionLS

    ChampionLS LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,066

    The fastest way I found to cut borders... especially curved ones is to first draw a line with soapstone. (not chalk or marker) A red carpenter's pencil works well too. Then I use my cut off saw and quickly chase the line to create a flowing cut. The cut is only 1/8" deep. After that, I remove one paver at a time, cut it on the table saw and return it. Two guys (one moving the pavers and one cutting) can do 75' in an hour. (approx) Take it from there.
     
  3. McKeeLand

    McKeeLand LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 681

    the cut into the field will be done already, we usually just cut that with the cut off saw in place. i was curious about the actual cutting of the soldier, sailor course. how many feet per hour for cutting. that we do on the table saw and the cut off saw.
     
  4. ChampionLS

    ChampionLS LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,066

    Do you use a special layout pattern for the borders? Not sure I understand your question. Usually the field is what takes time cutting. I usually have some odd ball formula's for figuring out times.
     
  5. neversatisfiedj

    neversatisfiedj LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,028

    Chris , what table saw are u using ?
     
  6. McKeeLand

    McKeeLand LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 681

    maybe if some one has just a formula for borders; cut the field, cut the soldier course, install the edging. this driveway is all curves, so it is all cuts. championLS, we cut the field with the cut off saw, one pass and then cut the soldier course. its so much faster to cut as much as possible with the cut off saw rather than bringing the cuts to the table saw. only on tight inside corners that you can't use the cut off.
     
  7. mrusk

    mrusk LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,260

    Cutting the feild in place with the cut off saw is the right way to do it and the only way to get good smooth cuts and curves!!! Takes time to get good at it. I already recommened newbies to learn how to use the saw first b4 they try to cut in place.
     
  8. ChampionLS

    ChampionLS LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,066

    Nope.. not really. That may be true, because the blade is a smaller diameter than your table saw (12" Vs 14"), but there are several advantages to it. The main reason is dust. Dry cutting makes a major health hazard for the environment. You can use an adaptor and cut wet, but then good luck on sweeping your sand into the joints. Obviously on a very large job it may be easier to cut in place, but most of the time we take them to the table saw. Pre-cutting leaves a continuous true edge so you don't get those choppy edges, which are common when pavers are marked and not cut exactly on the line.

    My question before was...what do you mean by cutting the soldier course? All the soldier courses I've done are never cut, unless your doing a radius or adding a fancy double/triple inlaid pattern.
     
  9. McKeeLand

    McKeeLand LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 681

    that is what i was saying on my previous Post, the drive is all radius, so almost every brick is a cut on the soldier coarse. everybody does it how they like, but time is money and the fast way to cut the field in is with the cut off saw, hand down. i invested in a $100 respirator with the full face shield built in this year. best money i ever spent, i love it. you can fit a shop vac to the end of your saw to collect the dust if you like.
     
  10. mrusk

    mrusk LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,260

    Your talking about cutting each brick on the boarder so there are no gaps in the soilder course, correct??

    I have no formula, all i know is it takes ALOT of time if its a curvy job.
     

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