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Anybody have any experience with running a Christmas Tree farm?

Discussion in 'Christmas Trees & Seasonal' started by Asystole, Dec 17, 2010.

  1. Asystole

    Asystole LawnSite Member
    Posts: 40

    Howdy,

    We run a hydroponic produce operation in western Kentucky and have been considering purchasing an 80-acre property to start a Christmas tree farm.
    We're looking for Pros and Cons, major expenses, what's really involved, and what kind of return we could look at down the road. We're not looking at a "cut-your-own" setup, more of a commercial supply operation.

    Anybody have any experience with doing so?

    Thanks in advance for your time.
     
  2. Hoy landscaping

    Hoy landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 836

    I have some experience in the other end of that. My firehouse buys 3-400 trees to sell for a fundraiser. I think your biggest con will be that tree sales are going down. 5 years ago we could sell 1200 trees in December easily . This year we struggled to sell 320. we had about 80 left over that were chipped up. Christmas trees are a dying crop, most people are just going out and buying synthetic trees. they are easier, cheaper and cleaner. another big problem will be that it takes 5-8 years for trees to mature to the point where you can sell them. I am not sure that the demand will be there. Thats the way it is in PA, i cant speak for the rest of the country. Hope it helps.
     
  3. RD 12

    RD 12 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 85

    I have just taken over my uncles choose and cut farm and have found that looking over the past few years our sales have not dropped off and in fact picked up this year. I have had several offers to sell in bulk but after going over the numbers, it was to keep it as a choose n cut. The big difference is were are only about a 15 or 20 acre farm.
     

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