Apparently, no license needed for Roundup in Florida

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by Grits, Feb 21, 2007.

  1. Grits

    Grits LawnSite Silver Member
    from Florida
    Posts: 2,994

    I guess all "the powers that be" in Florida could care less if you have a license to apply Roundup in beds (limited commercial license). I have talked to my county extension, they told me to call the DPBR....so I did.....she was a B!tch and said to call my county extension:dizzy: . So I call the health department, they were nice, told me to call the Epa, I did. Even they didn't know who regulates this!!!!!!!!!!!! She gave me another number, but I got a recording, but I think it is just a neighboring county extension. I figure if the EPA doesn't know.......then who does?
     
  2. robbo521

    robbo521 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 601

    my thing on Roundup is they have it at every store in town so why make people have a license to apply Roundup.now the other chemical you all use then yes i think you need it.
     
  3. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    Why? There is no difference. There is nothing that tru-brown, Scotts, weed-man, lawn doctor, or any of the other companies spray that is not available in most any store and home and garden center. It is all the same active ingredients.

    Grits, as far as the Roundup deal, you just happened to have caught a chain of dimwitted idiots who not only had no idea what they were talking about, but by the sounds of it have either the need to be educated on the matters that they work with, or have no business occupying the position of employment that they have.:rolleyes:
    Incidentally, you will want to look up the Florida Dept of Agriculture. :)
     
  4. Grits

    Grits LawnSite Silver Member
    from Florida
    Posts: 2,994

    I agree. But it is all about the money with government. They want to make money on anything they can and they will try to make damn sure that they will suck a business person dry. Fees for everything! Even Roundup and similar chemicals that any "head-up-their-azz" homeowner can buy. Obviously not one person in a position that should know, has a clue about it. If I get busted then that will be what I will tell the judge. I told the EPA that I am a legit business and I want to be able to legally spray the stuff and they were clueless on the subject. Amazing! I don't know what to do at this point. BUt I am really in need of spraying Roundup.
     
  5. General Landscaping

    General Landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 802

    Commercial Landscape Maintenance Applicator Certification - The Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance Certification Program was designed to allow commercial landscape maintenance personnel to make pesticide applications (using herbicides, insecticides and fungicides, with a signal word of Caution) to ornamental plants and plant beds only. It does not allow landscape maintenance workers to make any kind of pesticide applications (including weed control and/or weed and feed products) to any turf areas. Furthermore, this certification does not allow or authorize the maintenance company or the certificate holder to supervise company employees under their certificate or operate a pest control business.

    Beginning July 1, 2006 individuals who wish to make pesticide applications to plant beds and ornamentals no longer need to qualify for the Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance examination by providing proof that they have worked in the landscape industry for three (3) years. An application for the LCLM certificate is made to the Bureau and an exam admission slip is provided to the applicant provided they have obtained six (6) hours of Department approved plant bed and ornamental training. The applicant makes arrangements with the local County Extension Service office or an approved provider to take the Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance examination. The exam is then graded in Tallahassee and certificates issued to applicants who successfully pass the examination.

    Finally, an applicant seeking certification will have to provide proof of insurance which indicates that they or their employer meets the minimum financial responsibility requirements for bodily injury and property damage. Proof of insurance coverage must be provided prior to issuance of the certificate. Presently, these amounts are set at: Bodily injury: $100,000 each person and $300,000 each occurrence; and property damage $50,000 each occurrence and $100,000 in the aggregate; or combined single limit coverage of $400,000 in the aggregate.

    Questions regarding this limited certification should be directed to the Bureau office at (850) 921-4177.
     
  6. General Landscaping

    General Landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 802

    Too bad you can't get everyone to sign off on their (bad) information.
    It would be sweet to plunk that down on the judge's bench and walk out with a whistle.:walking:
     
  7. Grits

    Grits LawnSite Silver Member
    from Florida
    Posts: 2,994

    Ya know, I kind of figured that it would be the Dept of Ag. I called them, but they close too early. Thanks for the info!!!! Yeah, I hate stupid people.
     
  8. Grits

    Grits LawnSite Silver Member
    from Florida
    Posts: 2,994

    No doubt, that would be nice.
     
  9. Grits

    Grits LawnSite Silver Member
    from Florida
    Posts: 2,994

    AWESOME INFO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Where in the heck did you find it? I have looked everywhere online.
     
  10. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    This looks like it would be right on the state's DOA site.
     

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