Ash Trees Dying

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by eskals, May 22, 2001.

  1. eskals

    eskals LawnSite Member
    Posts: 210

    I am working in a subdivision with approx 45 acres of common areas. We usually lose about 2-3 trees a year. However, this year we have lost about 12-14 already. All the ones that I have seen are Ash trees. The trees are absolutely bare, no foilage whatsoever. There aren't any webs on the trees. Any ideas on what could be causing this? Worms? Disease? What should I look for?

    Thanks

    Eric
     
  2. greens1

    greens1 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 352

    Could be Anthracnose or Verticillium Wilt. Did the trees leaf out this year and then lose the leaves or did they not leaf out at all ? You may want to cheak the CAT alert's for info. Follow the link: http://www.msue.msu.edu/ipm/landCAT.htm

    Good Luck,
    Jim L
     
  3. paul

    paul Lawnsite Addict
    Posts: 1,625

    Some of the things I've notcied this year with trees dieing are when were they planted? late planted trees where stressed with the hard fall we had. Water, did they get a good enough drink late last fall? Protection, did you wrap them? Last thing where they grown localy, some nurseries have been importing trees because they ran out, so you might have southern trees, they might not beable to handle the early cold we had.
     
  4. there is some disease goin around now, ash dieback, ash blight, something like that. it is an airborne disease. i have been takin down a lot of ash's over the past few years. good money. i was just over at one house last week, we will be cuttin dead ash trees for a couple of days there.
     
  5. eskals

    eskals LawnSite Member
    Posts: 210

    If I am not mistaken, all of the dead trees have been in the ground for a few years. It looks like they didn't even get a chance to leaf out this year, although I will check on that closer.

    I am going to check on them a bit closer today, so I will let you know some more details tonight.

    Eric
     
  6. greens1

    greens1 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 352

    Hi eskals,
    I was wondering if you had any further info on the Ash trees ? I am in the same neck of the woods, so to speak, and have seen quite a bit of Anthracnose on mature Ash trees. The Disease has not been terminal but left untreated, or in less than mature trees, it certainly can result in death.

    Jim L
     
  7. eskals

    eskals LawnSite Member
    Posts: 210

    UPDATE!!

    Sorry about the long wait for more info. I was at the site today and examined the trees closer. All the trees are in non irrigated areas and the vast majority appear to have small buds on the ends of the branches. About half are fully de-foilated and the rest are about half foliage half dead. There is at least one tree that isn't an Ash that is showing damage. What I did notice is that the troubled trees have bark damage. In spots the bark is very soft and spongy. I peeled back a few areas and saw some holes. I also saw what appears to be tracks of some kind of insect. I attached a pic that I took of the tracks.

    Take a look and tell me what you think. I was also thinking of gypsy moth damage, but it seems very early in the year for that. My thought is that the trees are in non irrigated areas and are therfore under more stress that the ones in irrigated areas. Thus, they are more prone to bugs.

    Eric

    tree.jpg
     
  8. lawnboykb

    lawnboykb LawnSite Member
    Posts: 51

    Was that an old wound? That was healing over. I have about 30 ash in my yard that I have planted over the years and one of my small ones 6-8' did not come back until real late and then only about 1/4 of it on the one side leafed out. And I can't seem to find a reason as to why also.
    But I do prun this one with a trimmer to keep it in a small ball.
     
  9. greens1

    greens1 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 352

    That is borer damage in the picture. Wound is definatly old, just from the pic I would guess 3-4 yrs old. I am not certain that it would be worth spending money on treating severly declining trees, such as the ones you have described. If we were talking about 15' Japanese Maples or other specimine trees then it would probably be worthwhile to attempt to save them.

    Jim L
     
  10. eskals

    eskals LawnSite Member
    Posts: 210

    I think my plan of action will be just like you said Jim. I'll water and fertilize all the trees (not just the sick ones), to help prevent infestation of other trees. I'll go from there and see what survives.

    Maybe get the tree trunks sprayed next year.

    Eric
     

Share This Page