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Asphalt rollers

Discussion in 'Landscape Maintenance' started by BLC1, Mar 22, 2010.

  1. BLC1

    BLC1 LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 714

    Has anybody ever tried using one of the smaller asphalt rollers to roll a lawn. Something like a 1 ton ride on roller. Seems like it would do a much better job than pull behind roller.

    Let me know your thoughts.

    Thanks.
     
  2. zaxx

    zaxx LawnSite Member
    Posts: 2

    A few years ago, I bought a Wacker RD11 exactly for that purpose. I run a mid-sized cemetery, and we are constantly rolling sections of lawn before hydroseeding (fixing graves and ruts). We also use it for packing limestone gravel for use in foundations. Never bothered filling the drums with water for extra weight- wasn't a need. One downside- the soil must be fairly dry, otherwise the rollers will clog up.

    It's been one of the best investments I've made in years.
     
  3. shooterm

    shooterm LawnSite Senior Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 457

    You guys actually use a sod roller? :laugh: Two years ago we had a sod company quit in the middle of a street job and let a everything go to waste right before the winter. We got extremely fustrated so just did everything ourselves next spring. Bought a land plane used our blacktop roller bought sod from a local company that assisted. Anyways it never looked better. We actually used the roller not just parked it for inspectors. We knew the grade better considering we had half operators. Sod was actually laid correctly considering we had to deal with the inspector for the next phases.

    The roller doesnt get traction in muddy conditions. I dont think it matters though because you shouldn't be out making footprints to begin with. Its to cumbersome for tight spots. Works awesome for repairing shoddy sod placement. Needs a trailer.
     
  4. BLC1

    BLC1 LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 714

    The roller I was looking at was about 2000 lbs so it would fit on my landscape trailers. I figured it would actually take the lumps out. Any bad side effects?
     
  5. shooterm

    shooterm LawnSite Senior Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 457

    We used a normal Sod roller but it didnt work as well as we'd liked for the job rehab. The rehab was abit extreme and half of it was just actually pulling up sod regrading then laying it back down. I dont think it replaces a sod roller to many places its actually dangerous(people have a tuff time respecting a small heavy machine) or to cumbersome. Also running the roller over the sidewalks edges can chip concrete which leads to cracks be very careful.
     
  6. BLC1

    BLC1 LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 714

    I'm suprised more people haven't tried this or chimed in.
     
  7. Big Red Ferris

    Big Red Ferris LawnSite Member
    Posts: 119

    i roll every spring i have 75 contracts its busy i use a stone 11/2ton with a vib the customers love there lawns
     
  8. steve18974

    steve18974 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 14

    I have used everything from the 48" towable roller up to a 30 ton roller depending on what and where .... the big thing you need to watch is you are compacting the soil ..... so you need to aerate afterwards to open it back up .. and man does a 30 ton roller flatten the ground ......
     
  9. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,783

    So, before I chime in, I want to say that rolling is a horrible thing to do to a lawn, but I'm guilty of rolling a couple properties with a 1 ton pull behind roller in order to mow them a little faster. Luckily they are just larger In-law properties.

    Yes, asphalt rollers can be used, but you are also hurting the over-all health of the lawn by compacting the root zone.

    I've also been told to never use the vibrator as you might cause enough vibration to break underground utilities and irrigation lines. I think the vibrator is over-kill anyways.

    To me, the best way to slowly smooth out a lawn is to aerate 2 times a year for a few years. Even if you do roll a lawn I would suggest aerating it anyways to help release some of the compaction you've created and on top of it, it will help even more to smooth it out.
     
  10. BLC1

    BLC1 LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 714

    Yeah I agree aerating afterwards would be a good idea. The big rollers just seems like a quick fix and then continue you on with better methods.
     

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