ASV/CAT hand controls

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment & Pavement' started by Gilla Gorilla, Jan 3, 2006.

  1. Gilla Gorilla

    Gilla Gorilla LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 923

    Does anyone here own and or have operated a ASV with the hand controls?
    If so how do you like them and how hard was it to get used to moving the machine with your left hand and moving the loader arm and attachment with your right hand.

    I am thinking of demoing a RC50 or RC60 here in the next couple of weeks with a GP bucket and a Grappel Bucket on it.

    Also how do you feel about the design of the tread versus say the Bobcat "C" tread design when it comes to traction, which one provides better traction in loose soil and mud.

    Thanks
     
  2. dccarling

    dccarling LawnSite Member
    Posts: 62

    Justin,

    I think that you will love the ASV controls, unbelievably easy. My wife drives my RC-100 like a pro and my son can put it anywhere with ease. As for the track system I don't know how much traction the bobcat has, but the ASV can push better than I could ever have imagined.

    Doug
     
  3. Gilla Gorilla

    Gilla Gorilla LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 923

    Thanks Doug

    I really would like to get the RC60 with around 500 hours but I think that it will be a couple grand above my price range. I think I will end up having to get the RC50 and stay with that for a little while and see where things go from there. I would like to stay around the 20K range for something used and around 500 hours or so but we'll see how it all plays out in the next couple of months.

    I found a used Bobcat T190 with the gold package for $21,900 with less than 400 hours on it and a 2003. It sounds like it is priced really really low compared to all other T190's out there for sale. I really like the ASV machines but I need to demo some units first, then sell my Dingo and attachments before I can really start looking seriously.
     
  4. cddva

    cddva LawnSite Member
    Posts: 189

    I just brought home a new RC50 on the 31st. I'm a relative novice to this type of equipment and I only plan to use it for part time work and my own home projects for now. I moved to this machine from a compact tractor primarily for better maneuverability, compactness and increased power. With that said, I've only logged a few hours so far but the hand controls are already feeling "natural" to me. I can see it will take a little time to develop some finesse with them to operate efficiently but even with a couple hours I'm not doing to bad IMO. I can't speak to any comparison's with the Bobcat. I zero'd in on the RC50 for it's weight and price. I didn't want to be pushing the limits of my trucks 10K GVWR or my budget. I've read nothing but good reports on the ASV machines and with CAT behind them it seems like a strong combination. The ASV track has no steel bands inside and they come with a 1000 hour warranty. For me I think it will take longer adjusting to the tracks as far as how to use them versus abusing them than it will to adjusting to the joystick controls. Good luck with your decision!
     
  5. Scag48

    Scag48 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,067

    The ASV/Cat hand controls are the only way to go in my opinion. Much smoother than any other hand control system out there. Fatigue is no longer an issue, I can run the machine all day without getting tired from running the controls. As far as the Bobcat track design vs. Cat track design, the Bobcat design is a deeper lug, but it also has more flat surface on top whereas the Cat bars grip in mud much better, there's more "notches" for the mud to get in to.
     
  6. allinearth

    allinearth LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 609

    I preferred the Cat over ASV. Seemed to be built a little heavier. Didn't like the fiberglass engine cover. That thing is an expensive accident ready to happen. You may want to look at the 247b or 257b.
     
  7. Digdeep

    Digdeep LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,840

    Gilla Gorilla,

    I think the hand controls on the ASV/CAT machines are great. I sold Bobcat for a long time and I even have hand controls on my S220 because of their ease of use. Very easy for someone to become productive with them. I also think the RC-50 is a great choice. I bought a used RC50 and have been very happy with it's performance. I passed on the Bobcat tracked machines based on my sales experiences, and I demoed the CAT machines along with the others. Earthworker is correct that the CAT machines are heavier (the 247 is over 2,000lbs heavier than the RC-50), but when I demoed the RC-50 against the CAT 247 it was much quicker, lighter on it's feet, and climbed better. I also bought a guard for my machine to protect the fiberglass hood. I agree with Earthworker that it should be steel, but I haven't hit it yet. Based on my personal experiences so far, and my past Bobcat sales experience the RC-50 offers the biggest bang for the buck. Best of luck.
     
  8. all ferris

    all ferris LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,307

    I've used a takehuchi tl150 and after using ztr mowers and bobcats for so long it took me awhile to get used to the hand controls. Once I got used to them they were ok, however, on the tl150 there was no feed back in the controls at all. I like a little feedback on the controls to let me know just how heavy something is when I pick it up or just how hard I am pushing on something. Another thing I didn't care for was how that particular machine went backwards. If you wanted the maching to go backward and to your right as sitting in the machine you had to move the control back and to the LEFT????? I used the tl150 for part of the day and then I had to get on a 550h dozer and the controls on the dozer made more since(control back to left made machine go back to the left). Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but aren't cat/asv controls the same as takehuchi???
     
  9. Digdeep

    Digdeep LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,840

    All ferris,

    You are right that the TL150 has the same control pattern as the ASV/CAT controls. The lack of feedback you experienced is due to the fact that there is no mechanical linkage between the pump and the controls such as in a Bobcat with hand and foot controls. The feedback you feel in the Bobcat is caused by the pressure build up in the pump resisting the linkage moveing forward/backward. The joystick controls in the CAT/ASV/Takeuchi machines are tied to the pump via a block that proportions oil down to the pump by moving plungers in the controls. That proportioned oil then shifts the servo pistons in the pump that control the amount of flow to the drive motors. That is a really simplistic description, but it will have to do since it is all I know based on one of my old Bobcat shop technicians and the ASV dealer that I bought my RC50 from. The pro to the joystick controls are:

    1. less operator fatigue
    2. finite control for delicate work

    The cons are;

    1. some folks like to feel the feedback (such as you)

    I hope this helps.
     
  10. Gilla Gorilla

    Gilla Gorilla LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 923

    Man this is some great info for me to keep in the back of my head for when I am demoing these machines.

    I am leaning towards the ASV machines even though I have not operated one yet. Plus I am also only reading great reviews about them.

    A friend of mine that owns a small tree company wants to put in some money on whatever machine I choose to get. I need to get with him and find out just how much he wants to put in since he will only need the machine about 10 to 15 times a year versus me using it most of the time. I do know that he will need a grapple bucket which will work out great for me also since I could use it for tearing out old concrete walkways and driveways and dumping into a container. I am also leaning towards a 4-1 bucket with a bolt on tooth bar versus a standard dirt bucket since it will allow me to pull out existing shrubs and trees when I am doing a renovation on an existing landscape.

    Have any of you guys done or seen someone make their own cab inclosure for a skid steer or tracked loader? If so how did it look and function?
     

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