Back to the basics

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by Newby08, Feb 13, 2008.

  1. Newby08

    Newby08 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 277

    I've noticed more and more people like me who are wanting to get into organics or just learn more about them. I would like this thread to be a place where they can get the gist of what it is all about without all the big terminology or little abbreviations. I've learned a lot, and I'm sure y'all are starting to get tired of all my questions. I am doing my own research but I think learning from experienced pros like yourselves is probably the best way to learn. So... anyone who wants to start, remember to start at the beginning and go slow. This will hopefully be a way of pointing people to the right info to get their feet wet and learn, and then go from there. Also any helpful websites or literature that can be useful as a good starting point that does not get to deep would be appreciated too.
     
  2. Newby08

    Newby08 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 277

    I think a good place to start is the Soil food web from what I understand and have read. This site seams to have it pretty well in laments terms so those of us new guys can start out with out too many mind blowing info. It explains things very well down to what micro organisms are and what they do.

    Check it out,

    http://soils.usda.gov/sqi/concepts/soil_biology/soil_food_web.html
     
  3. Newby08

    Newby08 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 277

    Some abbreviations that will be useful to know;

    N = Nitrogen
    K = Sodium
    P = Potassium
    Ca = Calcium
    Mg = Magnesium
    S = Sulfur
    - check out this website to see what is used for what and why they are important http://www.agr.state.nc.us/cyber/kidswrld/plant/nutrient.htm#Nitrogen

    There are many many others but I'm too tired to come up with them all so anyone else that has some feel free to post them

    Thanks
     
  4. Newby08

    Newby08 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 277

    AHHH look at me, see, this is why I made this post lets try this again...

    N = Nitrogen
    K = Potassium (thats what I originally thought, don't they say to go with your initial decision?)
    P = Phosphorus
    Ca = Calcium
    S = Sulfur

    - check out this website to see what is used for what and why they are important http://www.agr.state.nc.us/cyber/kid...t.htm#Nitrogen it's still good.
     
  5. Newby08

    Newby08 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 277

    Oh, by the way, before we get any further...

    If you are planning on doing this as a business you need to get a license, go to your local extension agency and they should be able to hook you up. Here in Ga you have to get the study materials, pass a couple of tests and I believe that's it. Then you also need to have insurance and a business license on top of that.
     
  6. Elden

    Elden LawnSite Member
    Posts: 137

    Newby, looks like you are having a nice conversation with your self. J/K Those are good link for the basics. I surely agree with everyone who wants to be in the business of applications need to be liscensed. Even w/organics there are some risk in application, and there isn't any way to regulate it except for liscening. I bet people in the business would not let their drivers liscense or vehical registration expire, so why do they think it is ok to apply with out proper liscensing. It's just crazy.
     
  7. Newby08

    Newby08 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 277

    lol,

    What do you mean? I was talking to me and I along with myself... that's three people... talking to just myself, thats nonsense. I'm not crazy... does that face look like the face of a crazy person?

    I DON"T THINK SO!
     
  8. Newby08

    Newby08 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 277

    when you hear about people talking about compost tea they are talking about a solution they make by "brewing" organic matter such as compost and in return they are able to derive beneficial organisms from it. CT stands for Compost Tea, AACT stands for Actively Aerated Compost Tea.

    AACT has much more beneficial properties in it since it has a constant source of oxygen flowing through it to supply the microorganisms. If the air is taken away a lot of the organisms would die. AACT has to be applied usually within hours of being taken off the air source. AACT is great for both the soil and application to foliage of plants.

    CT can be used as well. From what I understand it does not have as much beneficial microorganisms in it. It can be used as a drench. CT does not do as well as an application to foliage, does not stick as well.

    From what I understand both are used for feeding microorganisms and for plant health. I believe both are good for strengthening a plants ability to defend against diseases.
     
  9. Newby08

    Newby08 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 277

    Again, if I am wrong in my postings PLEASE point it out to me so I am not giving the wrong information. Also others are more than welcome to make their own posts, please... like Elden said, I feel like I'm talking to myself and I am to new at this to feel comfortable to be posting on my own. I take it since no one has corrected me so far I must be doing alright.

    Thank you.
     
  10. Newby08

    Newby08 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 277

    CGM...

    Corn Glucose Meal, I have also heard it be called corn gluten meal, however you spell it.

    Basically it is an organic preemergant, or Pre-M. CGM is high in Nitrogen and should usually be used about twice a year, depending on where you live. CGM will nuturalize the seeds and keep them from growing roots. The best way to prevent weeds in your lawn is to have a healthy thick lawn to crowd out weeds all together.

    You don't want to use CGM if in the process of over seeding or reseeding, hence the keeping seeds from growing roots as stated before.

    "For best results, you need to activate the CGM by watering it in the soil. Then it needs to be followed by a dry period, like about 10 to 14 days. After that, your watering should follow a weekly schedule of one inch per week, on average.

    It takes about 3 weeks for the soil organisms to break down most protein meals and you should apply your AACT approximately 3 weeks after you've applied your CGM."
    -Gerry Miller

    good luck everyone
     

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