Backflow Testing

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by MMEC, Mar 26, 2008.

  1. MMEC

    MMEC LawnSite Member
    from East
    Posts: 36

    For those of you that test: What is your preferred equipment?
  2. For DCVA the vertical tube is my preferred method...
  3. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,697

    Not only that, the price is right.
  4. NC_Irrigator

    NC_Irrigator LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NC
    Posts: 1,415

    midwest 830 is the industry standard
    the 845 is a popular kit as well

    i have two 830's
  5. MMEC

    MMEC LawnSite Member
    from East
    Posts: 36

    Did you buy yours new? I was looking into a Conbraco 845 model type, it looks identical to the Midwest model. Is it just re-badged? Easier to swallow the $725 for the Midwest as opposed to the $1100 for the Conbraco. Thanks for the help.
  6. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,697

    Look for one on eBay - just don't expect to find one for twenty bucks (unless you really luck out) ~ You have to get it certified anyway, so the provenance isn't critical.
  7. irrig8r

    irrig8r LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,535

    I got out of backflow testing a few years back but still have my Midwest tester collecting dust in the garage.... I got into it during a drought period where I thought to diversify.

    I'll check the model number and see what it might go for on ebay...

    Around here the water company used to provide a list of testers with notifications... only about 10% were landscape related.

    These days RPZs are used in a lot of place, from restaurants to dog groomers to hospitals to high tech assmembly or parts cleaning outfits. Mostly I got calls for those... never did a hospital though... big and scary looking devices...and I didn't have a source for replacement parts if needed.

    Just didn't make sense to me to try to fit them in to my busiest season..

    I've tested PVBs, DCVAs and RPZs. Always drove me crazy the way many landscapers cluelessly install them with the testcocks up against a wall (residential applications).

    For businesses where they're required here, and separately metered landscapes, they have to be within 3 feet of the meter.. which results in rows of them curbside at many industrial parks.
  8. DanaMac

    DanaMac LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,156

    I've seen that out there in Cali, and it looks ugly to me. Detracts from the landscaping and leaves susceptible to vandalism. But, code is code.

    I was asked a few years ago by a fire safety company about testing. They were told I was licensed, but my license is for installing the BFD, not testing. So I looked into the testing, and it was tough for me to justify the costs of starting up for testing, when I only have time in the winter to do it. And the timing wouldn't have worked for the fire company. Basically they lost their one certified guy for it.
  9. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,697

    That's one thing I admire about california - they aren't afraid to look at backflow devices, so there they are. Even those Antisyphon Valves a few feet from a front porch.
  10. MMEC

    MMEC LawnSite Member
    from East
    Posts: 36

    I agree that many landscapers are clueless regarding types of backflows and proper installation. But I was surprised when I noticed that the backflow device for the irrigation system where I took my backflow class at had two major no-no's. Will bring that to their attention after I get my Proficiency cert.:laugh:

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