baseball field ?

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by tnmtn, Nov 21, 2005.

  1. tnmtn

    tnmtn LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NE Tn.
    Posts: 1,021

    i am curious as to what would be a good type of grass for planting in the infield of a baseball field. i have volunteered my equipment and some time to the high school coach to try and fix the field up some. we are thinking about completely rodoing it after next spring season. a friend suggested a dwarf fescue. i figured someone on here might have some info on what is usually used or suggestions for baseball field upkeep. mild climate in northeast tennessee.
    thanks in advance for any help,
    metin
     
  2. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    Is it irrigated?
     
  3. tnmtn

    tnmtn LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NE Tn.
    Posts: 1,021

    no, its not irrigated. there is a hose fitting where sprinklers are run out from.
     
  4. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    Sometime around middle of March:

    - Core Aerate the whole field real good. NO not double just make sure you get it all.
    - Use a 90% germ rate fescue blend, such as Contractor's blend, Lesco, et.al. Drop at LEAST 100 pounds of this, 150-200 lbs. might not hurt.
    - Drop some starter Fertilizer, such as a 14-28-10 or thereabouts:
    First number range 10-16 (low nitrogen)
    Second number range 25-35 (high potash)
    Third number range LOW teens (schhh... I think it's magnesium).
    Usually, one bag per 20k sq. feet, but read the label. 2-3 bags for the field should do it, but depends on the brand.

    - Drop a calcium-based neutral type of fertilizer (0-0-0). You can also use lime but I prefer the 0-0-0 because it's better results and for less $$$. The kind I use is called So-Cal and looks and smells like chocolate (don't ask).
     
  5. tnmtn

    tnmtn LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NE Tn.
    Posts: 1,021

    topsites,
    i appreciate the help on this. all advice has been written down and will be followed. i have already run the box blade over the base paths and will be running a landscape rake in the spring to get rid of rocks. it seems we grow rocks around here. the grass part i didn'tknow where to start. thanks again.
    metin
     
  6. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    Ok,...now with that out of the way, here's what you do if you want to grow grass. How is the existing turf? Decent, but has weeds? What are your temps like down there, now? Soils going to be above 55 degrees for awhile yet (like 6 weeks)? Have all your weeds sprayed now. Then, in about 2 to 3 weeks, go in with a rented slit-seeder, and put in Turf Type Tall Fescue (TTTF). This will be lesco's TeamMates blend or TeamMates Plus (which has a 10% Kentucky Blue in it). It goes in at 5 lbs. per thousand sq. ft. it is going into existing turf, 8 lbs. if it is going into bare ground. Run it at half rate, and go 2 different directions (perpendicular, preferabally). The benefit of a turf type tall fescue is that it grows a deep root system, and is wear and drought tolerant where other cultivars of turf are not. Do NOT plant a contractors blend as was mentioned above. These contain what is called K31 (Kentucky) which is also a tall fescue, but is NOT a turf type. This stuff is the really wide bladed stuff that grows eradically and grtows at all different heights (a noxious weed in some finer lawns). Also, don't use an aerator. You will get MUCH better spread, distribution and germination rate with a slit-seeder. An aerator just pokes holes in the ground, many times too deep, then doesn't allow germination of most of the seed when they close back up. Also, instead of a nice even distribution, you will have "plugs" where the seed that DID take is just because it was the seed that dropped in these random holes. Even distribution is even MORE important with a tttf because tttf's grow with what is called a bunch type growth habit, as opposed to a prostrate growth habit that other turfs are. (Research these terms and you'll see what they are). Now, for your starter fert, the above was partially correct on that. It IS the second number that you want to be a higher number on the analysis, but it isn't potash or whatever he said. It is phosphoros. the third number is Potash,..not magnesium. Make sure you get water to it and keep it consistently moist. Hit it again in 2 to 3 weeks with fertilizer (same).
     
  7. tnmtn

    tnmtn LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NE Tn.
    Posts: 1,021

    the turf now is very clumpy and full of weeds. thanks for all the help with this.
    metin
     
  8. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    This changes things. If it has all beeen worked up with a box scraper, settled, and has weeds now growing in it, spray the area with glyphosate, come back in a few days later and work just the top layer (like with a thatcher NOT a tiller). Broadcast your seed, rake in, and roll. Apply your starter fert. and hit it again in 3 weeks. Again, keep it damp.
     
  9. tnmtn

    tnmtn LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NE Tn.
    Posts: 1,021

    we haven't worked the infield with the box blade yet. i did run the box blade on the edges of the basepaths where some dirt had built up over the years. the coach was hoping to try to clean up the field with as little as possible damage to what is already there rather than run a risk of the field not being ready for practice in late feb. march. after this next seaon the plan is to rip up all of the old sod in the infield, regrade it condition the soil and reseed or sod it. the weather is already turning pretty chilly. we were afraid we had missed the window of oppurtunity to start from scratch this year.
    thanks for the help on this,
    metin
     
  10. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    Ok I am sorry I gave you bad advice on contractor's blend... I myself use Certified University of Oregon seed but didn't know if this was available in your area... But, this has been covered... Main problem with Ky31 is it is 0.04% weed vs. the usual 0.01% or less, yes.

    Only 1 thing:

    IF you treat the weeds OR Seed, make SURE the weed treatment AND the seeding are 30 days apart during GROWING season! The reason is the weed killer will interfere with germination and prevent the seed from growing.

    Far as the numbers on the fert, I'm sorry I am not concerned what each one is called, heh... But thanks runner for clarifying all this...

    I may have to check into this slit seeding... Btw, CORE aeration is NOT spike aeration, just so we have that straight...
     

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