Bermuda Grass!!!!

Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by GameDawg33, Aug 8, 2006.

  1. GameDawg33

    GameDawg33 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 35

    I can most likely pick up a very large account,but it consist of all Bermuda Grass which I dont really know anything about and dont have any mowers to cut this type of grass. I heard you need real mowers. Are they any good? Someone told me that you can purchase a gang of real mowers to go on your current mowers and pull them around from hitch. Are these any good. Is it hard to work with Bermuda, like a big headache or anything, or O.K.??
    Thanks any info would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. stumpjumper

    stumpjumper LawnSite Member
    Posts: 183

    Use the same mowers you use anywhere else. Nothing special about cutting bermuda.
     
  3. clallen03

    clallen03 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 511

    Be careful not to cut it to low because you will cut all the green out of the lawn. You will have a brown lawn for about 3-5 days. This is not pretty and the homeowner will not be pleased. This is main thing to look out for when dealing with Bermuda.

    These lawns should be "scalped" early spring to remove all brown grass from the fall. This is a premium service so we charge the homeowner at least 3X's the cost of a normal cut. Its a dirty job because you have to bag all the clippings and normally I cant even make two passes with the mower before I have to empty the bag, so it well worth the money.

    Hope this helps.:)
     
  4. ABeautifulCutAboveInc.

    ABeautifulCutAboveInc. LawnSite Member
    Posts: 118

    Bermuda grass is on all the golf courses here in florida. You regular mower will be fine, just cut it low. But, like he said don't scalp it, it will turn brown. I found I usually cut it on 2 1/4" sometimes two depending on the contour of the land.
     
  5. lawnmaniac883

    lawnmaniac883 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,613

    Yall must be talking about a different kind of bermuda :confused:

    I cut a bermuda/staugustine lawn at 4.5'', sucker looks fantastic. It is always thick lush and green well not so lush as bermuda is a very stringy grass but it looks friggin good. I guess you could cut it low if it is just bermuda and not 50/50 with st.augustine.

    Also, scalping bermuda is called verticutting, research the topic a little :waving:
     
  6. ABeautifulCutAboveInc.

    ABeautifulCutAboveInc. LawnSite Member
    Posts: 118

    Verticutting is maybe the name of cutting the grass that way. Lawnmaniac, bermuda and st.augustine are two totally different grasses. St. augustine grass is fine at 4.5", but you won't even come close to cutting bermuda at that hight. The growing patterns are completely opposite. About the research topic, you don't have to do research when you've been born and raised in Fl your whole life. I've learned about this grass since I was a little kid.
     
  7. befnme

    befnme LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,413

    the only reason it turns brown is because all the chlorophyl is at the top . i cut bermuda all week ,every week at 2 to 2 1/2 and it looks great . after you cut it the first few times it will begin holding the chlorophyl at the bottom.
     
  8. OX Landworks

    OX Landworks LawnSite Member
    Posts: 49

    Here in Oklahoma we have bermuda grass, and more bermuda grass. Granted, I have never measured it, but it seems like at 4.5" tall the bermuda would be starting to seed out, is that the case for you?
     
  9. ACEMowing

    ACEMowing LawnSite Member
    Posts: 93

    Yep, we cut about 80% bermuda and 20% fescue here in northern Oklahoma. Bermuda is trainable but 2" to 2.5" is the norm around here. I've never seen bermuda at 4" unless it had a ton of seed heads at the top.
    And of course, we do scalp it each spring at 1" or so.
     
  10. evergreenedmond

    evergreenedmond LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 310

    Don't be so sure of yourself, scalping is simply cutting off all dead grass from the previous year nothing is cut into the ground, it is NOT called verticutting.
     

Share This Page