Best fuel stabilizer?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by crazyflyboy30, Mar 14, 2013.

  1. TuffTurfLawnCare

    TuffTurfLawnCare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 668

    Not sure if your baiting a response or not, but no. the cylinder walls are still cast iron. plus the film of engine oil, plus the fact its only in there for a fraction of a second before its burned.
     
  2. birddseedd

    birddseedd LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,114

    Makes sense. forgot they have a sleeve in them. I's that the same for my boat, keep in mind its 30 to 60 years old?
     
  3. TuffTurfLawnCare

    TuffTurfLawnCare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 668

    Depends on the boat. Most outboards were cast iron as are most I/Os. The Marine blocks had a higher nickel content to help resist corrosion. Cast iron blocks in boats is still largely the norm even in brand new boats. You didn't see much aluminum on the marine industry with fresh water cooling systems because of the corrosion of aluminum when immersed in salt water. With closed cooling systems becoming more common, so are aluminum engines as the closed cooling systems run antifreeze through a liquid to liquid heat exchanger.
     
  4. birddseedd

    birddseedd LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,114

    I'f thats the case, then i think i'm good on the gas at the pump. i'm not spending thousands of dollars in time and travel fuel to obtain "better" gas when the only thing i have to gain is that I wont have to spend 40 bucks on a new carb for my trimmer 5 years from now.

    But I will use a can of sea foam once a month to clean out the carbon and keep my engines running efficiently.
     
  5. TuffTurfLawnCare

    TuffTurfLawnCare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 668


    If that works for that's great! But don't take what I wrote to mean e10 doesn't effect boats. It doesn't effect the block, heads, etc. The ethanol will sit for long periods of time in the carbs, and they are made of aluminum. This brings us back to the ethanol corroding aluminum. Its here that the problems happen. Its in the fuel system, not the cooling system.
     
  6. birddseedd

    birddseedd LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,114

    so what would be good to protect the carbs on my boat after i pull it out of the water? Short of draining the bowls it seems theres no real option that is worth the money it costs. new carbs arnt really that expensive.
     
  7. TuffTurfLawnCare

    TuffTurfLawnCare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 668

    That's the problem and why the marine industry is pushing back against the ethanol. around here the marinas sell pure gas without ethanol. a lot of people have had mixed results with the treatments. We had a lot of people that requested we drain the fuel systems as part of winterizing. Some people did nothing and never had problems.


    Since the ethanol is mixed at the fuel racks, it wasn't unheard of to find well over 10% ethanol in a certain load of fuel at any given time at any given station with the exception of the marinas that sell pure gas. At our Marina, we would drain the fuel bowls on the carbs after we fogged the engines and ran antifreeze through them. But every spring I would rebuild a dozen carbs due to the effects of ethanol on boats where the owners did nothing to prevent it and only filled up at the local fuel station on the way to the water.

    Its a roll of the dice some never have a problem, others always had problems.
     
  8. birddseedd

    birddseedd LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,114

    hmm. maybe its worth getting some for my boat. although not worth using it in my trimmer.
     
  9. RaulMcCai

    RaulMcCai LawnSite Member
    Posts: 32

  10. farmmower

    farmmower LawnSite Member
    Posts: 135

    This product appears to have been developed in the past couple of years and perhaps a little better chemistry especially for B&S motors. I have a Ferris 3100Z with the Big Block 36 HP. I know some of the B&S dealers carry Startron which also reviews well with users here. I called B&S and the woman said she thought the additives were all pretty much the same - not sure she had any background to say this? I've seen all the discussion on the additives but looking for something a little more technical or first hand knowledge that the B&S might be better to run all the time or that the name of the product really doesn't matter?

    I can order the B&S product free shipping or get the other products locally at a store.
     

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