Best fungicide Brand?

Discussion in 'Fertilizer Application' started by LawnMowerKing10, Jun 25, 2012.

  1. ron mexico75

    ron mexico75 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,689

    Down in the Richmond area. Brown patch here started about mid April and has been really flaring up the past week or so.
     
  2. oqueoque

    oqueoque LawnSite Bronze Member
    Male, from NJ
    Posts: 1,652

    I applied Headway G on two lawns that had showed symptoms of fungus in the past. When I applied it 3 weeks ago, symptoms where beginning to show. I am not seeing any further damage now, and some areas are filling back in. I am going to be putting another application down next week. Last year we were hammered with summer patch here. I am following suggestions from Sygenta. They also recommend following these two applications with a third using Cleary's 3336.
     
  3. bweier

    bweier LawnSite Member
    Posts: 8

    I am a retired lawn care owner and have battled fungus in my yard for the last 4-5 years. Last year I started to get it dialed in and this year I have it fully under control. Here is my advice:

    1. Core aerate the lawn twice a year (spring and fall)
    2. Over-seed and/or spot seed after each core aeration until desired grass density is achieved. Use a high quality local seed mix from a local landscape supply/nursery that is dialed into your area. Shady mix...and sunny mix...keep it simple!
    3. Water deeply and infrequently...1-1.5" or water total per week (includes precipitation) 2-3 times per week max. Water between 4am and 8am...never after that time. Setting a timer for specific days really won't get you where you want to be...turn it on manually on a dry night before going to bed with timer for between 4am-8am...otherwise risk sprinklers on during rain storm or when your lawn doesn't need the water.
    4. Keep your blades sharp! Try and never remove more than 1/3 of the grass with each mowing. Mowing too short or scalping will lead to lawn stress and likely fungus...don't do it. Keep it short in the spring and then longer in the summer...your lawn will thank you.
    5. Let your lawn breathe and dry out each day. This will require removing low hanging branches and pruning hedges and bushes to facilitate air flow and good circulation. I cannot emphasize this point enough...let it breathe!
    6. Use a high quality slower release fertilizer that is dialed in for your area. Most towns will have a good landscape supply/nursery that will sell a proprietary blend. Mine is 25-0-8 Shaw's Turf Food here is SW Michigan. It is worth the time and effort to find and use these locally sourced and locally specialized products. I use this every 6 weeks and skip Crabgrass and Weed control because my lawn is so thick...I just hand pick or spray the few weeds.
    7. For lawns with a history of fungus, apply a high quality granular (Headway G) as a preventative as soon as overnight temperatures are conducive to fungus development. Put it down at 3.5 #s per 1000 sg ft (13 setting Earthway 2150) every 28 days.

    If you have an ACTIVE fungus infestation, I recommend the following:

    1. Use a hose end or backpack spray product and apply the fungicide to the entire lawn or any areas that are suspect. This will knock the fungus down immediately. Any quality fungicide will work to knock it back while you order your Headway G...hint hint.
    2. Once the liquid fungicide has been applied, get Headway G down in 14-21 days after and repeat every 28 days until you are comfortable the issue is resolved.
    3. Studies have shown that nitrogen deficient lawns are more susceptible to fungus. So if you are remiss in your 6-8 week fertilizer application hit the lawn with fertilizer the same day you SPRAY the liquid in step 1.
    4. WASH YOUR EQUIPMENT WHEN FINISHED! You worked so hard to get the lawn fungus under control, why spread it or reinoculate your lawn next week when you mow?

    That is my 2 cents...obviously geared more towards the anal homeowner (this guy), but good tips that the pros can follow as well. Not every homeowner will want to spend the money on Headway G ($100 per application approx for 8-10k sq ft) or source local seed/fertilizer, but battling fungus and developing a healthy lush lawn you simply cannot take shortcuts.

    Good luck!!
     
  4. oqueoque

    oqueoque LawnSite Bronze Member
    Male, from NJ
    Posts: 1,652

    How many times a year are you applying the Headway G? I would be concerned with building up a resistance to it. The manufacturer of Headway G Sygenta recommends applying a competitors product Nufarm Clearys 3336 in conjunction with the Sygenta products in order to reduce the risk of resistance.
     
  5. bweier

    bweier LawnSite Member
    Posts: 8

    My intent is 2-3 x per year...this is my first year on it. I have a few calls in to answer your question and will let you know what I find out. I do use Clearys 3336 in my ornamental gardens...solid product.
     
  6. ron mexico75

    ron mexico75 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,689

    You know, the Headway G I'm REALLY impressed with. First time using it on a lawn that was showing high pressure. I applied at 4#/1000 and also 16-2-3 at .5#N/1000 and I have never seen tall fescue this green throughout the summer. Of course, watering has been a huge factor but that Headway G just knocked it out and I'll be at 28 days this Saturday with essentially little to no fungus pressure that I can see, maybe a tad. However, I am doing one last app of Heritage but I'm thinking Headway just because of how pleased I am with it.

    Anyways, I have checked with all 3 local suppliers and NOBODY has Clearys 3336. 2 don't stock it at all and the 3rd said he's never even heard of it. Is it just my area or is that a lesser known product?
     
  7. Skipster

    Skipster LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,074

    What "fungus" have you battled?
     
  8. bweier

    bweier LawnSite Member
    Posts: 8

    To answer a few questions at once. My fungus issues have been dollar spot, red thread and brown patch.

    Concerning fungicide resistance, here is what I have been told.

    "There is definitely truth to alternating fungicides but it is blown out of proportion. They are just like any pesticide where a plant or insect can build up a resistance over a long time. Using the same fungicide for 2 or 3 summers in a row is not going to build up this resistance so I wouldn't worry about it much at all."

    For the Cleary's I was given a tip on another product which may be worth a look.

    "Cleary's 3336 is an excellent fungicide and extremely safe for ornamentals and humans. I will say it is kind of costly because the coverage for most diseases is only 7-10 days. I would recommend Propiconazole 14.3 for this application. It is a slightly lower rate and can give up to 21 days control with almost the same price per quart."

    This advice comes from my salesman who carries all the products I have discussed...he has been great for me and his prices seem to be excellent. My results with the Headway G are nothing short of excellent...my grass LOVED it.
     
  9. bweier

    bweier LawnSite Member
    Posts: 8

    Give lawnandpestcontrolsupply a ride in the Google machine....Jonathan is great, free shipping, carries ALL products discussed (including Cleary's) and his prices were the best for me. I normally don't promote a specific vendor but some of you may need a good source...this is a good source.
     
  10. Skipster

    Skipster LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,074

    I asked which “fungus” specifically because they all have different characteristics and respond differently to treatments and cultural practices. If you have dollar spot and red thread, you’re N fertility program is lacking. Fertilize the proper amount at the right time (spring and fall, since these are cool weather diseases) and you won’t have dollar spot or red thread. This is way cheaper and more effective than spraying a fungicide.

    Think you’ve got brown patch? Check what turf species you have. If you’re in Portage MI (as your location line indicates), you won’t get a lot of brown patch weather to begin with and if don’t have any tall fescue in your lawn, you won’t get much brown patch at all. Kentucky bluegrass isn’t susceptible to it and perennial ryegrass is only moderately susceptible. Your recommendation #6 about using slow-release N fert could be making your brown patch problem worse by making more N available during brown patch conditions. Although adding N helps to get rid of dollar spot and red thread, it makes brown patch worse. Your recommendation #7 doesn’t make much sense, either. When is an overnight temp conducive to fungus development? For red thread, you need overnight lows in the 50s. For brown patch, you need lows in the 70s. Which one do you use?

    Also, your rec #2 for when you have an active disease is only going to make brown patch worse.

    It sounds like you bought what the salesmen were selling you and that you made a lot of boat payments for them. You could have had the same results or better without spending so much money and without doing so much work making the applications.
     

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