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Best way to fix brown spots

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by twins_lawn_care, Aug 15, 2003.

  1. twins_lawn_care

    twins_lawn_care LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 932

    I am new to the biz, and just wanted to get some advice on the best way to attack brown spots on the lawn. The lawn we are doing is growing very well, but looks like some chemical were dumped on the lawn, and all the grass was killed (dry and brown) RIP.:angel:

    Anyways, I have not yet repaired and lawns, and would like to learn:
    SO my questions are
    1) best time to do it
    2) seed or sod
    3) ground prep?
    4) any other advice

    Thanks for the help guys.

    PS- I've been searching and reading up on this also, but wanted to post to get some feedback, and get to know some people.
  2. GLAN

    GLAN Banned
    Posts: 1,647

    More than likely what you are experiencing is "Summer Patch"

    Aerate to deal with compaction, raise cutting hieght if cutting to low. If your licensed to apply can apply a fungicide. Spray would be quicker control
  3. I don't know, but from what I've heard/read is that once the fungus shows up, there is no fix (I guess you could remove the dead grass and re-sod). But I think spraying is a preventative measure, not a fix.
  4. twins_lawn_care

    twins_lawn_care LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 932

    Thanks for the replies, but I am almost sure death was caused by chemicals, as there is a lot of work going on with the house.
    Is it best to seed, and let it naturally come back, or to sod?
  5. GLAN

    GLAN Banned
    Posts: 1,647

    Wait and see what comes back.

    If chemicals are the problem as you suspect. You may not be able to seed and have any success for a while.
  6. twins_lawn_care

    twins_lawn_care LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 932

    Thanks GLAN,
    That mkaes sense, as the chemicals may still be there.
    I'll give it a while, and see what happens.
    Then I can suggest a solution.
  7. work_it

    work_it LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 976

    Unless you're liscenced sub it out to a reputable chemical lawn company. Have them run soil samples, etc. If your clients don't want shell out the money for it your only other option is to wait it out and see if it grows back.
  8. GLAN

    GLAN Banned
    Posts: 1,647

    Can test seed a spot
  9. seascape

    seascape LawnSite Member
    Posts: 12

    Perhaps flowable activated charcoal app? If your sure its spill damage. Lesco has it.
  10. fblandscape

    fblandscape Banned
    Posts: 776

    Dig out the effected soil down something like 6" or a little more if you can. Replace with fresh loam and seed.

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