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Better mowing blades are so close but yet so far

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by pinnacle, Sep 8, 2003.

  1. pinnacle

    pinnacle LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 791

    Been looking at a few different types a metals latley and have come to the conclusion that mowing blades that are available could be made alot stronger and made for lower maintanence.

    A tungsten cobalt mix would make an excellant cutting blade.
    Why do MFGs persist in making "mid Qaulity" blades that cost a fortune???

    I saw a thread a while back that was posted by a guy called blademaker and there was alot of good ideas put together on that thread. Like replacable cutting tips etc.etc

    I know a tungsten cobalt mix would be expencive but if I can get three or four time more wear out of them without sharpening I'm sold.

    I just don't understand why MFGs don't utilize these stronger metals.
    I was talking to a guy the other day that told me light bulb MFGs have had the ability to make light bulbs last for 20 years but have patented the idea and will not bring em out on to the market.(greedy buggers) I just makes me think if where sort of having the wool pulled over our eyes???
  2. BSDeality

    BSDeality LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,850

    *waits for a reply from meg-mo.....*

    yah, i don't understand it either, why not use carbide? or some decent metal that won't dull when i hit a damn stick.
  3. pinnacle

    pinnacle LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 791

    Yep its beyond me:dizzy:
  4. locutus

    locutus LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NC
    Posts: 1,266

    to me the answer is obvious, weaker metal means more sharpening and more frequent replacement, hence more money for them. imo.
  5. ElephantNest

    ElephantNest LawnSite Bronze Member
    from La.
    Posts: 1,878

    If Toyota thought like that, they wouldn't be the number one selling import. Quality sells.
  6. geogunn

    geogunn LawnSite Gold Member
    from TN
    Posts: 3,010

    apparently the cost of the indestructable blade exceds the cost of a reasonable sharpening.

    the air mini die grinder can whip an edge on a blade that isn't in bad shape in seconds.

  7. Rustic Goat

    Rustic Goat LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,194

    There's your reason. Mfg's/suppliers have a mind set of having to have the cheapest, leading to volume of sales, they all think they're WalMart. I agree, with the quality you speak of, also wonder if there'd be a problem with being too brittle, tip breakage and flying projectiles.

    Here's a high dollar blade, not too much info available on the site though.
  8. crawdad

    crawdad LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,939

    What would you use to sharpen it? You need a diamond blade to sharpen carbide, wouldn't you?
  9. Meg-Mo

    Meg-Mo Inactive
    Posts: 1,020

    You guys are all right in what you are saying and that is why we invented the MEG MO blades. There are rules that blades have to met and when they do you are in for some sharping.
  10. SpudsM15

    SpudsM15 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 627

    WOuld i be using he same set of your blades for mulching and bagging?????

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