Bidding on big businesses

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Turf Tiger, Jul 19, 2008.

  1. Turf Tiger

    Turf Tiger LawnSite Member
    Posts: 32

    I have been residental mowing for the past 2 years and ready to step up to commercial mowing. I am new to the bidding process so I am looking for tips. I mean how do you guys come up with the figures. Do you look at it and try to set yourself up for a certain amount an hour. Or do you measure and add it up by acres. I mean I know you have to add in gas costs and other factors. If someone could please tell me how they much they charge and how they add it all up it would really help me. Any other advice on how to outbid people or any other tips on getting these big jobs would help.
     
  2. Turf Tiger

    Turf Tiger LawnSite Member
    Posts: 32

    For some reason all of my posts are showing up and disappearing. I hope someone will help me and answer my questions
     
  3. Two Seasons

    Two Seasons LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 791

    Refresh your screen after you post!

    Regarding your questions, you could start by using google and plot the acreage that you would bid on.

    The first thing I do is get to know who is in charge of these services for the corporation you want to do business with. That, in my opinion, is the first step! Until you develop a relationship with the "outsourced maintenance contact" at their business, all you will probably do is spend money and lose sleep and still not be any further ahead.
     
  4. jaybow

    jaybow LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Mi
    Posts: 1,089

    I have also been running a landscape company for two years. And will also be putting some bids out this fall on commercial work. First thing get the contact info on who and where to submit the bid to. Second thing is to size the property up and estimate how long its going to take you to do the job. Consider how many people you will have with you if any. I am gonna say $50 an acre is whats probably average in my area but you have to consider how much edging and trimming there will be . Also if its going to be mowed weekly or bi-weekly. But like I said I am new to this to.
     
  5. Turf Tiger

    Turf Tiger LawnSite Member
    Posts: 32

    When does your bidding take place. In KY I was told by a guy that mows that he bids in Feb. He could of also mislead me to be a ass. Anyways $50 an acre seems a little to cheap. When have alot of industrial plants around here to mow. They seem to pay alot. Anys when does Bidding start in the Midwest.
     
  6. Two Seasons

    Two Seasons LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 791

    Between end of November to end of February.
     
  7. jaybow

    jaybow LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Mi
    Posts: 1,089

    Well it seems like I always see guys talking of submitting bids in the fall on here. You could always just ask whens the best time to put the bid in when you get the contact info. Pretty sure they start taking bids around late october for next years buisness. I was told by the dealer where I buy some of my equipment that they usually dont notify the winning bidder until the last second. So you really wont know how to prepare yourself. I would say since you never know from year to year how much commercial work you will land to hold onto a good amount of residential work.
     
  8. jaybow

    jaybow LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Mi
    Posts: 1,089

    How much do you guys get for an open acre with little trimming in Wisconsin.
     
  9. Az Gardener

    Az Gardener LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,899

    Why do you want to commercial work? I usually just ignore these posts but I'm just a glutton for punishment.

    Lets see... compete against bigger companies that have been doing it for years and have their costs down to the penny. That know how to hire and manage many people. They offer many varieties of services and are already competent at them. They get preferred pricing on materials, equipment insurance and the list goes on. Commercial properties are notorious late payers and you need a work order for any and every little thing. To say nothing of the increased administrative costs, all communications need to be in writing. That's what I want to do? Yea sounds great, give me a helmet here I go.. :hammerhead::hammerhead::hammerhead:

    On the other hand you have Homeowners... simple hardworking folk who usually are pretty good about paying their bills. Your competition is... well lets just say the bar is set pretty low. You already have a decent start but lets face it two years wouldn't even get you through high school. You still have a lot to learn and more money to make in this arena.

    I have worked in all phases of this industry since 1978 and upscale residential service is where I have chosen to hang my hat. If this is the industry you have chosen I believe you would be better served to better hone your skills in the residential market.

    On the other hand if I had it to do over again I would probably flee this industry with both feet. Good luck :waving:
     
  10. Two Seasons

    Two Seasons LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 791

    About $70 for single acre and down to around $35 for multiple acres.
     

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