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  1. Mike_Smith

    Mike_Smith LawnSite Member
    Posts: 46

    What do you think about using a big rig with a tight turning radius like the kenworth T-800 for plowing? Obviously just using the cab and dump body, no load.
     
  2. diggerman

    diggerman LawnSite Senior Member
    from Iowa
    Posts: 702

    You will need 2or3 three tons or it will helpless.If I get an account that I am working on I will be putting a 11 ft blade on a 96 mack ch612 that has a 13 ft body on it.I already have a 1999 mack rd that has this blade on it. We do opening runs at our large commercials and then take them to the local airport to do runways. If you plan on using them for any thing but large commercial it can get a bit tight in places, anything is doable if you have a good driver.If the truck is a tandem I will be to long for alot of places,but tandem are just about like having 4x4 if they have a lockig diff. If it is only a single I would have a set of chains available just in case.AS for the truck I have all macks but I realy like the T800,its a comfortable truck,nice size cab and KW makes good trucks. Our trucks have between 350 and 400hp w/ a 8LL trans , and with a load on they will move some major snow.Last year one of my drivers and I were plowing the main runway at the airport,we both rounded the corner together he in a tandem mack rd and I in a 97 topkick single w/190 hp he just left me straining to see his tail lights, he was pulling away that fast w/a loaded blade the whole way.As for hunting you might try http://www.truckpaper.com,also KW makes a model called a T300 which would be my prefrence,checkem out on that web page
     
  3. Mike_Smith

    Mike_Smith LawnSite Member
    Posts: 46

    What do you mean by tandem? What do you mean by 2 or 3 tons or it will be helpless? Is it possible to use a T-800 with dump on residential driveways as well. I have a very skilled driver. Also, what size plow can these big rigs handle?

     
  4. GeoffDiamond

    GeoffDiamond LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 1,651

    You need 2 or 3 ton of weight to keep traction. They can handle a 10' blade no problem. Residential drives no way, no matter how skilled your driver is.

    Geoff

    [Edited by GeoffDiamond on 09-02-2000 at 12:30 AM]
     
  5. diggerman

    diggerman LawnSite Senior Member
    from Iowa
    Posts: 702

    Tandem is two axles and like Geoff said residential is a big no way(single or tandem) not only because of manuverability but also weight will be a problem and cracking a driveway will cost big.
     
  6. snow

    snow Guest
    Posts: 0

    mike_smith ,
    first of all welcome to the forum. for a newbie you seem a little jumpie to get into some big plow rigs. a big plow truck is good for things like commercial and industrial and plowing highways. but residential is out of the question. unless you have the truck already, i wouldn't buy one or use one for plowing unless you were plowing big stuff. the state of ct pays about $135 an hour for plowing. if you own that truck, see if you can sub for towns or big contractors.


    bryan
     
  7. Mike_Smith

    Mike_Smith LawnSite Member
    Posts: 46

    I do own the truck already and I'm wondering if it is totally and utterly completely impossbile or just not the best thing to do residential driveways? I don't want to buy another truck and I really love that truck so selling; no way. I would sub, but I really want to do my own thing though, so I can pocket all the money and set my own hours ect. I don't care about cracking pavement since I have that in my contract that I take no liability and it would almost never crack it because I wouldn't be carrying a load and the weight is more evenly distrubed than cars ie(3 axles). I am planning on doing commercial work, but not the first year for my buisness. Please tell me if its a complete impossibility with my kenworth. Thanks ahead. Its a 158 inch wheelbase so its a small wheelbase. Doesn't have sleeper or anything, just day cab with dump body.
     
  8. snow

    snow Guest
    Posts: 0

    sorry mike, but there's no way your plowing driveways with a beast like that. the weight of the truck'll crush it. if you want to get a plow for the truck and just plow small roads or commercial accounts, look into a big plow like a Viking or Tenco.Geoff will saw a 10' fisher for sure, but you need like an 11' plow to clear the wheel width. call universal welding , they sell viking plows. also, look in the big truck and equipment trader. if you get a 1-way, you only need a small pump, and you can take the head gear off for the summer. if you want to sand, you need a central hydro system. if you do sanding, get a undertailgate spreader.


    email me at BKrois@aol.com if you want to know of some plows for sale.


    Bryan
     
  9. Alan

    Alan Member
    Posts: 1,185

    Mike, you've already been told that it is totally impractical to use that truck in residential service. Maybe not impossible, but then again, very little is impossible, just real hard to do.

    Set your own hours? Mother Nature is going to do that for you and you will have no choice!

    If you're so set on plowing with it you would be way better off to work for a municipality until you get a clue of what is involved,

    So what if you have a bulletproof contract, you won't have the customer after you tear the place up. Incidentally, ground pressure is equal to tire pressure, which is probably about 100 PSI on your rig. Don;t bother debating that, the agricultural people have determined that doing studies on soil compaction with tractors, same gravity applies to both.

    You WILL be plowing with a load or you WILL be stuck! I don;t care how good your driver is, once you get a little snow under those tandems you won't have traction. Have you ever driven that rig in snow? From what you're trying to tell us it seems apparent you have not.

    I'm setting up a single axle, 5 yd dump with a big plow, but it will get used only on private streets and large lots, no way is it suitable for residential work, too big, too clumsy and too slow.

     
  10. GeoffDiamond

    GeoffDiamond LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 1,651

    Ok

    I have an F 650 and (another F 650 and a F 750 on the way), it dose a great job on commercial. It will not do residential. Big Trucks will not do the residential thing. I have Some L 9000 twin, and tri axles, and they don't plow. The turning radius, is just too big.

    Forget about a contract that protects you from liablity, it won't hold up in court. You need insurance incase you hit the car with your plowing going down the road, as well as a million other reasons.

    As far as pocketing money, it can be done for residentials ( i don't do it), but know many who do. You have no chance in pocking money from commercial accounts ( at least in the form of cash)

    My advice for that truck. Find some private roads, get a 10 or 11' plow, sander. Plow some private roads. That truck is too big to do all the work on most lots, so there would be a lot of snow left. If not work as a sub for a town or state.

    Don't forget the snow sets your hours, not you.

    Geoff

     
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