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biggest mistake

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by dustin ward, Jul 21, 2004.

  1. dustin ward

    dustin ward LawnSite Member
    Posts: 30

    if yall could share some input on the some of the mistakes getting where you now.what i mean is if you were to do all over what would you diff.out in the feild,finacially office type issues also.
     
  2. EastTnLC

    EastTnLC LawnSite Member
    Posts: 131

    Take what you can get and dont try to start out big. For ex: New truck, trailer,and New equipment. You'll hit rock bottom so fast you wont know what line of work you were in. (Financially speaking) Gradually work your way up to more equip, more contracts,and maybe more employees. Always remember "Beggars cant be Choosers"
     
  3. BCSteel

    BCSteel LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 876

    I would have taken business classes before I started out on my own.
     
  4. PMLAWN

    PMLAWN LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,535

    Spend slow! Do one thing and get good at that than go on to another. Don't try to do it all at once. Spend slow! When you have done your homework and you know how long a job will take--ADD MORE TIME.. Spend slow! When you have done all the budget work and you know exactly how much it will cost you to be in business---ADD MORE MONEY, Spend slow! Learn how to run a business, running the business is more important than cutting the grass. Learn how to sell. Listen to the customer as they will tell you what they want. They do not care about what you give, only about what they want, learn how to sell!
    Oh yah--SPEND SLOW!
     
  5. txlawnking

    txlawnking LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,905

    This business is more about salesmanship than cutting grass.. If you can't sell yourself and your services, either learn, or maybe consider another industry..Charge people at least the market average, don't invest in equipment that you don't have the work for, and most importantly, develop a business plan. Without a compass ( sound business plan ) to guide you, the chances of your survival, let alone success will be slim to none. In other words, get your ducks in a row, BEFORE you make another move.
     
  6. SouthernFried

    SouthernFried LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 273

    Not sure if I wanna go into mine again so soon.

    I'll leave it at this:

    "Don't put all your eggs in one basket"
     
  7. LwnmwrMan22

    LwnmwrMan22 LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,372

    I would have never taken on employees.

    This is my own personality though, I CANNOT stand fixing what others should have done right in the first place. Cutting grass is NOT brain surgery and when I have to go to another yard to finish what a crew of 3 missed, I had had enough.

    Best thing "I" ever did was go back to being solo.

    You can still NET as much money being solo as with 4-5 guys, just have to fine tune your business.

    Second thing, get contracts, no per time mowing.

    It's hard to make payments for equipment, gas, whatever you have credit for when it's dry and your customers don't water.

    I've got everyone on contracts, and now when there's no rain for 3-4 weeks and it's 90 out, I'm still getting cash flow.
     

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