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bio diesel

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by baldguy_420, Jun 3, 2007.

  1. baldguy_420

    baldguy_420 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 6

    any suggestions on a good diesel engine for a riding mower, I'd like to convert my regular fuel scag into a bio diesel powered monster mower. i've checked out the briggs dihaitsu 31 hp model. not bad, just want to see more options.
  2. NittanyLawncare

    NittanyLawncare LawnSite Member
    Posts: 83

    Any current diesel engine will run on bio-diesel. B5 (5% Vegetable/Animal Oil and 95% Petroleum Diesel) runs just like regular diesel would straight out of the pump, B10 is also a good permenant use fuel. B20 (20% Vegetable/Animal Oil and 80% Petroleum Diesel) is a heavier mix and probably the most you want to run the engine on if you only run bio-diesel. You can run heavier mixes like B50, but you'll get gumming in the engine because as the thicker mix cools, any residue still left in the engine will start to solidify. B100, which is essentially straight vegetable oil, can be run in any diesel engine you find, albeit it will shorten the life of the engine. I wouldn't recommend just running it start and stop with B100 either. You should set up dual tanks, one for pure petro diesel and one for B100 vegetable oil. Add a switch you can control manually and run petro diesel for 10 minutes at start and 10 minutes before shutdown, run B100 in between. This will help wash the engine when your done with it and help it with the stress of running up to temp before you switch over to the oil.

    The orignal diesel engine just like the current ones, were initally designed to run on hemp oil, or any other vegetable oil for that matter. They found that when you used a more volatile and less viscous fuel like diesel, it extended the engine life dramatically. Thats why we run diesel in them today.

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