1. Missed the live Ask the Expert event?
    Not to worry. Check out the archived thread of the Q&A with Ken Hutcheson, President of U.S. Lawns, and the LawnSite community in the Franchising forum .

    Dismiss Notice

Black Gold

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by Daner, Sep 12, 2007.

  1. Daner

    Daner LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,308

    With the dry season that we had here this summer,I was able to get Into my back pond with the big loader and clean It out a bit...Now I have this huge pile of Organic material ( "Black Gold") So What do you think about this material...or what would you do with It.
    I was thinking it would be good to mix in the garden...but a bit concerned about the weed seeds...how would it be if used as a top dressing on the lawn??...maybe the vegetable garden??
  2. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,081

    Lake muck is supposedly a valuable commodity worth about 20 bucks a bag!?!?
    Dredging a wetland w/out gov't permission can land big trouble so determine the amount of discretion needed to market your product.
    What is it good for in your list of possibilities? All of them.
  3. upidstay

    upidstay LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,341

    Personally I don't like pond sludge. Anaerobic is not good. Basically dead soil. Generally has a lot of fine particles in it which will make soil compact hard. Ok to mix in a little bit, but not a lot. I generally steer clear of pond dredgings.
  4. P.Services

    P.Services LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,322

    thats a fact, it will need to get cut with a very sandy and light soil to even be worth its own weight in dirt. that stuffs worth 20 bucks a yard screened.
  5. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,081

    I have black muck from a pond that is turning into swamp as time goes by. When I heard of the value of the muck - I considered... that it is several thousand years of accumulated nutrients... Many of which (nutrients) no longer exist in many highland soils.
    To test the theory: I set up an experiment.
    The only materials were 1 - 5gal. pot, sufficient amounts of pure muck, and carrot seed.
    Water only. No fertilizer or supplements/ammendments.
    This year : broccoli and a bit of Miracle-Gro.
    I know how my muck compares to the "best" highland soil. Learn about yours and good luck :)
  6. Daner

    Daner LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,308

    Muck ...Thats a good name for It...and thanks for your Input guys.
    I'm still wondering about the weed seed though...I,m going to try a experment of my own... I'm going to top dress a SQ Yard of of my lawn...and see what happens...one thing for sure this stuff takes along time to dry.
  7. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,081

    Depending on the surrounding area the seeds in the muck are mostly lowland or wetland seeds that won't really germinate in high and dry environments. My piles didn't dry quickly either and did grow some strange weeds, but once it is dispersed into the lawn the seeds should not be a problem.
    Yes, the moisture retention is quite good.
    Keep us posted on any changes in the lawn and how well in works into the soil.
  8. Norm Al

    Norm Al LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,227

    thats stufs money in the bank!
  9. Daner

    Daner LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,308

    I have noticed near my muck piles...the grass Is dark green.
    also...I planted some hedges today and used the muck as my compost.
    I'l let ya know if they live or not.
    I'm thinking i'm gona run some through the manure spreader and lay some on the lawn with a sprinkel of seed:)
  10. Gerry Miller

    Gerry Miller LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 504

    I would have the material tested by lab for it's content before using.

Share This Page