Blade Comparison Pictures

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Audrey, Jul 24, 2006.

  1. Audrey

    Audrey LawnSite Senior Member
    from Pa.
    Posts: 570

    There was a discussion a couple of days ago as to what blades come on a new mower from the factory. Evidently it is high lifts, but not in all cases. In this pic I set up a few different blades for a comparison.

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    It's a close call with the OEM blade. It seems to be right in the middle of the J Thomas blades.

    Here's another with a little different angle....


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    I thought it interesting the angle of the standard mulcher compared to the other blades. There's no pronounced "angle" per se. It's more of a gradual incline. I wonder if this will help reduce the hosepower needed to perform the cutting action. The high angle of lift, in particular the Oregon blade in the first picture, robbed me of horsepower big time when I used them on the 23/52 machine. So much so, that I couldn't utilize three of them at the same time.
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    Here's one comparing the two mulch blades.

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    The first thing to catch my eye was the difference in thickness between the mulch blades. It would seem logical that the thicker blade would tend to absorb more punishment in the form of rocks or sticks before bending or cracking. All will obviously lose their edge. However, how much does rotating mass factor into robbing horsepower? Would a lighter blade retain blade tip speed better? Or do you need the mass of the heavier blade to smash the clippings and leaves? I think I would opt for the speed.

    Also, the lift is a little greater on the Gator. I would think this would help if discharging, but does it in mulching? The clippings are going up, where else could they go? Both have the teeth on the lift to chop them again. Would the higher lift cause more to stick to the deck and/or pack it quicker?


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  2. rodfather

    rodfather LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,501

    I've noticed over the years my mulching blades whereever I buy them from are never as thick as my OEM highlifts.
     
  3. coyotekid

    coyotekid LawnSite Member
    Posts: 111

    While we're on the subject of blades...

    I'm searching for a distributor that has a straight-forward listing of blades with cross-reference part #'s to OEM blades.

    For example, I'd like to try Oregon blades, but I've yet to find an online dealer with a no-nonsense listing of blades interchangeable with OEM blades for my Grasshopper and Gravely as well as Ariens push...
     
  4. TLS

    TLS LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,937

    Audrey.....we think alike!

    I have been researching blades since '97 when DC went from .204" blades to .250" blades. I was upset because I lost RPM's with the thicker (otherwise EXACT same design) blades.

    The SUPER high lift SCAG blades are WAY too high. They take WAY too much power. I cant even run them on my 14hp 48" WB. Your basically pushing a billboard under your deck!

    How about a picture from above showing the length of the foils and if they're notched or solid. And also showing the length of sharpened edge.

    I can sit and discuss blade and deck design for hours. I missed my career calling as an engineer. The only numbers I'm real good at are the ones with the $ sign in front of them!
     
  5. pugs

    pugs LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,022

    The extra spinning weight would help. Once you get them spinning it will be tougher to slow them down...However if you do slow them down, it will be tougher to get them up to speed again. I dunno how much of a difference going from .200 to .250 makes in weight. Obviously it will be more but probably not enough to make a huge difference.

    Are those regular Gator's or Gator Magnums? They have Gator High Lifts too. The Magnums would be thicker.
     
  6. martinfan06

    martinfan06 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 631

    GREAT POST lot of good info!
     
  7. tacoma200

    tacoma200 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,426

    Hate to say it but your in the wrong line of work. Very good photographer. I have no doubt with you camera/computer (photoshop) skills you could make a living in photography. What kind of Camera/lens combo are you using. I have a Canon digital rebel I use alot but carry a cheapy to take my lawn shots. I have bought some J-Thomas blades that were stamped Oregon after the paint wore off but this was the gators which they no longer sell. They changed the name so I doubt they use Oregon for the new Mamba (gator type) blades. Tacoma
     
  8. grass_cuttin_fool

    grass_cuttin_fool LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,504

    ''The SUPER high lift SCAG blades are WAY too high. They take WAY too much power. I cant even run them on my 14hp 48" WB. Your basically pushing a billboard under your deck!''

    I have to agree, on my tiger cub, 20 hp , the high lift blades just kill that engine and Im not able to run them

    ''The extra spinning weight would help. Once you get them spinning it will be tougher to slow them down...However if you do slow them down, it will be tougher to get them up to speed again. I dunno how much of a difference going from .200 to .250 makes in weight. Obviously it will be more but probably not enough to make a huge difference''

    On my tiger cub the engine never recovers, it puts it under an almost constant strain. I put that set of blades on a 15hp kohler gear drive walkbehind and they do ok, It loads the engine up some but boy does it pack grass in the accelerator catcher

    wayne
     
  9. ProStreetCamaro

    ProStreetCamaro LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,155

    Look how high and steep the oregon high lifts are. I bet they create some serious vacume and lift the grass good. I may give those a try one day just to test them.
     
  10. Nosmo

    Nosmo LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    That Oregon blade in the first set of photos has a very high
    lift to it. It will pick up the grass ( vacuum) and that is the purpose of its design.

    Check your owners manuals to see what your machine's manufacturer has to say about choices of blades. It is going to require more power to propel these blades.

    Looks like it would be a give and take situation -- mow at a little slower speed to take advantage of the greater lifting power.

    Nosmo
     

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