Bluebird aerator-quirk

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Toroguy, Sep 18, 2000.

  1. Toroguy

    Toroguy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,075

    I rented a Bluebird aerator on Saturday. It had a roll over safety turn-off switch. The switch was so sensitive that it turned the aerator off on the slightest incline. I had to aerate up and down slopes, but even the angle on my turn arounds would shut it off?

    I had to restart it at least 50 times on one lawn, the rest were pretty flat but probably 50 more shut offs on the other five yards.

    Do all aerators have this feature or only rental or Bluebird?

    During the off season I may have rotator cuff surgery from pulling the rip cord on that baby!
     
  2. BUSHMASTER

    BUSHMASTER LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 519

    I had that problem on my bed shaper when i rented it check the oil level it will shut the engine off on small incleines if it's anything but full or the sensor could be bad...but it would probally be a good time to buy it from where you rented it from, after all if folks are having problems they might get rid of it.
     
  3. KirbysLawn

    KirbysLawn Millenium Member
    Posts: 3,486

    FYI, if you look at the front of the engine there is a wire with a male/female plug, just unplug it when on hills and problem solved.

    Ray
     
  4. Evan528

    Evan528 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,144

    same exact thing happed to me when i rented the bluebird aerater last year... it was driving me nuts shutting off on a 5 degree incline! when i returned it i cmpained and they explained that the oil was a littl elow and the sensor was reading very low when i was on inclines and shutting off the engine.
     
  5. Toroguy

    Toroguy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,075

    Bushmaster,
    I dont plan on buying an aerator for two more seasons, but you have the right idea on geting a good deal.

    Kirby,
    Now that you mention it there was a wire like that. Next season I will know better.

    Evan,
    A couple times the fricken thing wouldnt restart for 5 minutes...I bet the oil was responsible for that difficulty.

    Even with all the difficulties, it was a profitable endeavor. Armed with this new knowledge the frustration factor should be minimal.

    Thanks all.
     
  6. SLSNursery

    SLSNursery LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 442

    I haven't had an oil sensor problem, but we've had a Bluebird demo aerator for about a month, and the guys have noticed/complained that it simply goes too fast, especially when compared to the Ryan that we've had for several years. Any comments on this? Should I set the max. idle screw in, or adjust the cable tension?
     
  7. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    SLS, Just tell your guys to spped up! lol
     
  8. turfsurfer

    turfsurfer LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 364

    I would bet that this aerator had a Honda engine on it. Hondas have low oil level feature on them which shuts off the engine to protect it from low oil damage. This feature is useful on some items like generators,powerwashers and such but is useless on items such as aerators which encounter slopes alot. Anyway I found this out the hard way like you did by doing a lot of starter rope pulling the first day until I found the disconnect wire. BY the way this will not damage the unit since your oil is not really in a low state for any length of time.
     
  9. OU812

    OU812 LawnSite Member
    from wy
    Posts: 12

    I own a bluebird aerator with a B&S it dosnt have the oil alert so thats not a problem,but i have used one with the oil alert it is a pain but make sure the oil level is up and it shouldn't be that big of a deal.

    SLSNURSERY,
    As far as it being to fast tell the employee's to hurry up but if im behind it i just turn the engine R.P.M.'s down a little!!
    CRASH
     
  10. Ricky

    Ricky LawnSite Member
    Posts: 154

    I rented a Bluebird slit seeder back in Sept. It was powered by a Honda engine. I live on a very steep hill. I didn't have any problems.
     

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