Bluegrass developing light green patches?

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by Shady Brook, Sep 18, 2006.

  1. Shady Brook

    Shady Brook LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,517

    I have a lawn that is bluegrass sod on heavy clay. I have been using Natures safe organic fertilizer and have had good visibible results. The past few weeks I have noticed discoloration in the lawn with lime green patches appearing throughout the lawn. I am able to lift the grass and roots and move them, lifting them up as if there were grubs present, but the sod does not pull back in the same way. There are not grubs in any of the root zones sampled, and the lawn was treated with Mach 2 about 6 weeks prior. I have never seen this before, and am trying to identify it if it is a fungus or not. This is not a case of POA Anna, or POA triv. Help!
     
  2. dcgreenspro

    dcgreenspro LawnSite Senior Member
    from PA
    Posts: 688

    well, if no active mycelium is present, i'd say that some of this sod is having a hard time growing in the clay soil unless the sod was grown in clay soil, which is doubtful. The new roots are probably having a hard time trying to grow down into the stuff. If it were me i'd probably start a heavy aerification and topdressing program inthe spring.JMO
     
  3. Shady Brook

    Shady Brook LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,517

    This sod has been in the lawn for four years now. This is the first I have seen this type of discoloration. I was concerned it may be pythium, but have not noted mycelium present. Would the mycelium only be seen in the morning, or would it be present later in the day? The grass almost has a slimey texture, I fear it is fungal in nature. We have had lots of moisture and humidity with dew lasting late in the day. This along with a daily watering program on compacted clay seems to make it a good canidate for disease. Any other advice for me? Thanks
     
  4. dcgreenspro

    dcgreenspro LawnSite Senior Member
    from PA
    Posts: 688

    well, well, well. Yes, pythium it could be. You happen to describe it perfectly. What type of weather conditions are thier?High humidity and heat? Why are you watering it every day? What mowing height are you at?
    All of these questions are important to the final answer. I would take a plug of an infected area, wrap it with plasic wrap and duck tape. The idea being that any thing present will definetly show up because you have given it a perfect breeding ground. Send it to a testing facility. Await results.
     
  5. LIBERTYLANDSCAPING

    LIBERTYLANDSCAPING LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,283

    We haven't had near enough heat here in the last month to have pythium blight be a concern... I too am seeing symptoms what you describe on a LOT of lawns around here-sodded, or not. :confused:
     
  6. Shady Brook

    Shady Brook LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,517

    Liberty is correct, it has not been overly warm. We have been having alot of high 70's, low 80's with lots of moisture. I don't water everyday, the customer feels it is neccesary against my better wishes. The amount of surface roots on these plants is pretty amazing. It is almost like a guy trying to grow sod on concrete where the roots stay on the surface. The grass grows, but does not look healthy.

    Liberty, are you seeing the problem on clay yards?

    Thanks guys
     
  7. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    Your problem is a water related issue. KBG does not do to well in wet situations. Heavy rainfall, irrigation along with a clay based soil will not support a good stand of KBG. The roots are rotting from lack of oxygen while the grass is trying to utilize as much water as it can, causing cells to burst. The grass needs to dry out. STOP watering and aerate!

    BTW, I've noticed that an organic fert does not perform as well on clay based soils. This is due to less microorganisms available in the soil. The organic ferts need soil microorganisms to help break the ferts into usable components for plant uptake.
     
  8. Shady Brook

    Shady Brook LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,517

    Grassmechanic

    Thanks for your input, that makes alot of sense about the water.

    As far as the Organic's, that also makes a great deal of sense. This particular yard has floorished since I introduced Organics nearly two years ago. It was browing out with thick visible roots giving a brown appearance. The lawn was only one year old and had a root/thatch layer nearly 1.5" thick. I would not say the organics have eliminated the thatch, but the lawn now is the best looking lawn on this particular golf course. It thrives when others are floundering. I use last years experience with this lawn to try on some others on similar clay in nearby developments to find tremendous results. This may be the key though....I put down 1/2lb N per thousand monthly on these lawns. I have others in the same area with similar soil that I am doing 1lb/k N 4 times per year and the results have not been impressive. Actually my traditional fertilizer lawns bordering these look superior. This would seem to support your statements about the lack of microorganisms, or at least may in some way support them.

    I have also had great results in shady lawns using Organic fertilizer, but that should be a no brainer.

    Thanks for your post
     
  9. LIBERTYLANDSCAPING

    LIBERTYLANDSCAPING LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,283

    I'm seeing this problem on both sandy loam and on clay soils. I saw a TON of this in July/Early August-I was told it is the leaf blade outgrowing the root system. I generally see it on lawns that have irrigation systems. I know that in summer respiration is high and if you give the lawn a lot of N, and water, the plant can use up it's stored energy. My lawn is on heavy clay, and I didn't have any of those areas. (I don't have irrigation) BTW we got 9" of rain just in July...:dizzy:
     
  10. Shady Brook

    Shady Brook LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 1,517

    Last week many of my lawns got 5" of rain in 6 hours!;) With sewer issues and problems with pumping stations it made for a nice place to drive boats....and they did.
     

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