Book on Trees or Leaf Identification

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by mklawnman, Feb 27, 2003.

  1. mklawnman

    mklawnman LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 634

    I just thought about for this season I may need a book on identifying trees or say leaves of trees to help the customers identify what tree it is. I have a magazine on different tree types for say planting them in a landscape, but no pictures of leaves. Now I'm sure their are many of you out there that don't need a book, you can easily look at a tree and know what it is. Well I'm in the learning stages, in about 10yrs from now I wont need a book I'll be able to know what tree it is from just looking at it.
    Any suggestions to where to fine something like this.
    Don't know if this should go in the landscape thread or here so I'll put it on here and see what happens.
    Matt
     
  2. GroundKprs

    GroundKprs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,969

    You want the Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, by Michael A. Dirr. See it at http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t...f=sr_1_1/102-6307870-4453712?v=glance&s=books . You might want his pictoral book also, but this one will serve you well. You will also learn from this book that if you told me that the leaves in your hand were "opposite, simple, oval or ovate, 3-6" long, 1½-3" wide, abruptly acuminate, broad cuneate to rounded base, nearly glabrous and darn green above, glaucous beneath and usually only pubescent on the veins, with 6-7 vein pairs, petiole 1/4 to 3/4" long", I would not need a picture to tell you you are most likely holding a type of dogwood.

    Book is no pics, but line drawings of leaves, twigs, and sometimes flowers and seeds. Over 1200 pages, most any plant you will encounter.
     
  3. mklawnman

    mklawnman LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 634

    Hey Thanks, I may go take alook at Barnes and Nobles too and check and see if they have a book too on plants and tree types. That book is very detailed and descriptive but it looks like it just gives the specific name and not the general name, but i may be wrong.
    Matt
     
  4. GroundKprs

    GroundKprs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,969

    Do you mean scientific names and common names? Look at the index pages on the link given above. The first part of index in scientific names, the last part is common names. Dirr has the most complete coverage of woody plants, and gets better with each edition; above link is 5th edition.

    If you just want to learn what the plants are, you might be better served by purchasing woody plant keys. But with a key, you will have to understand all the plant terminology. If you cannot differentiate between pubescent and non-pubescent, or glabrous and glaucous, you will not get any functional help from keys either.
     
  5. mklawnman

    mklawnman LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 634

    Ok well thanks. I'm not in a bind right now to quick get one but it was just something I started to think about. Though I am going to be going through a landscape Horticulture program at a local tech school for a degree so I am sure to pick up on alot about trees and tree types and turf grasses and such. Which I already know some.
    Matt
     
  6. Just Turned Pro

    Just Turned Pro LawnSite Member
    Posts: 109

    The Dirr Books are great but I would suggest that you take some ID classes from a local college. If you just get a book and start trying to ID you may do more harm than good.
     

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