booster pump on well for irr

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by zliminator, Jul 29, 2006.

  1. zliminator

    zliminator LawnSite Member
    Posts: 82

    I've got a customer who wants around 2 acres irrigated and his well pump is a 1 HP sub in a 4" well with about a 100 gal. tank. I was wondering what kind of setup to recommend. Could I just use a booster pump or would I need an additional tank for just the irrigation? How would I prevent the booster pump from running the main tank dry? Is there a way to stage the timing of the zones so they give the well and tank time to recover?

    Dan
     
  2. Fatheroftwo

    Fatheroftwo LawnSite Member
    Posts: 19

    Size the zones so that the pump runs all the time. Find out the GPM's of the pump and go from there.
     
  3. speedbump

    speedbump LawnSite Member
    Posts: 117

    The pump will give all it can and a booster pump will only boost pressure not volume. It won't even boost pressure if there is no more water to be had. There has to be and excess of volume to increase pressure.

    bob...
     
  4. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    Bob,

    Wish you could educate some of our administrators on this. They feel that we can just keep adding systems to existing pumps and then throw a booster pump onto them. :)

    Without any master plan as to sources of water and a reluctance to drill additional wells more and more of our newer schools and systems are being put on domestic water which increases the overall costs. Some are forced to share well/pump resources.

    At one site they built a new middle school about 14 years ago and decided to cut out a new irrigation pump from the plans. They decided to just utilize the pump at an adjoining elementary school and let the two share the same well. They even threw on a booster pump for the new field areas to be boosted when that controller activates. Result is that over these past years the water days have required to be split between the two schools because there is not enough water to go around and since we only water at night to reduce the vandalism potential the field ares of both sites are sketchy at best when the heat comes on. The middle school has a looped 4" main line that at one point comes within 20' of the 6" domestic service. I've recommended cutting the middle school off the pump, setting up a new service and connecting it to the water service line but I guess it's not going to happen. Each year I just dust off a memo I wrote 14 years ago outlining the problems each time a new administrator asks, "What's wrong with the irrigation?"
     
  5. speedbump

    speedbump LawnSite Member
    Posts: 117

    Like Bill Clinton used to say, "I feel your pain Purp"

    What might be the answer to this entire situation is to let a bunch of grass and shrubs die due to lack of water. When the powers to be see what is happening, you can hand them the memo and just smile. Then maybe you will get what you need to do your job the right way instead of putting band aids on everything so the admins can spend the money on perks.

    bob...
     
  6. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    Well thought out plan... just one catch. I'd probably be fired if I tried this. :)

    Administrators don't like it when underlings show them up. I can't count the number of times when I've been advised on how to do my job because they think they know everything. I just let it go in one ear and out the other. Just once I'd like to walk into a classroom, office or board meeting and say, "Hey! You're doing it all wrong." :laugh:
     
  7. speedbump

    speedbump LawnSite Member
    Posts: 117

    Takes guts, but it might work if it's done in a room full of folks that wonder why the grass is dying.

    bob...
     
  8. zliminator

    zliminator LawnSite Member
    Posts: 82

    I told the customer its like trying to get blood out of a turnip. He said someone had quoted him $4500 for a new pump (going from a 1HP to 5HP w/ 4" pipe going down 600'). I told him I would price around for him.

    Dan
     
  9. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,003

    You could probably supply the watering needs of the acreage from the existing pump, with some split programming. You could also try to see what the maximum flow is (with minimal pressure at the tank) and compare it to the flow you get at higher pressures. It is always possible to design a (more expensive) system to run at lower pressures, which usually means higher gpm. Do the performance testing before you speculate about pumps. (or check to see if there's a log of the well's performance, as is customary when the well is drilled and the pump installed)
     

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