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brand new!!!

Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by adoni, Jan 15, 2005.

  1. adoni

    adoni LawnSite Member
    Posts: 2

    :waving: greetings... i've finally decided to take the plunge into self employment and have chosen lawn maintenance as my chosen profession. not having ever done lawn maintenance on a "professional" level, i am needing to know how to select the right mower to get started with... not wanting to set myself up for failure and not wanting to get in over my head, can anyone please relay some information??? i.e. - walk behind or a rider and what size??? also, what is the difference between echo and stihl??? any information for this crazy individual would be greatfully appreciated!!!
  2. Tn Lawn Man

    Tn Lawn Man LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 479

    First things first.....use the search feature. So much of what you want to know can be answered by searching previous threads.

    To answer your question you need to provide a lot more info.

    What type of accounts are you going to target, residential or commercial?

    How big are the lawns....5k sq ft, 15k sq ft, acres?

    What are the terrain characteristics, hills, ditches, flat etc...?

    Are you going to do this full time or part time?

    What other services are you going to provide....fert, seeding, aerating etc...?
  3. out4now

    out4now LawnSite Bronze Member
    from AZ
    Posts: 1,796

    Like TC said use the search function for faster answers. You need to find out what your dealers carry first of all then start researching what will fit your typical jobs. Stick with top brands for better service when it comes to maintenance. You need to find out some info about your demographics associated with your region. You can do this through your town website usually. Focus on similar jobs if possible, don't wind up with a huge mower for only one account if all the others are small. There are a lot of things to consider. Local library will help alot too with all kinds of info available. Costs vs. pricing is where guys seem to go wrong the most. Know your costs per hour and per minute if at all possible. If you plan to incorporate in the future gather info now. A lot of the pointers a corporation commission will give can also help a sole proprietor ship. Check out some of the tutorials on the Small Business Administration website (SBA) for short. DRAW UP A BUSINESS PLAN ! That is a way to avoid some headaches. If you plan to be an operation that will hire employees in the future look into work comp. info and payroll now can save time in the future. If you are currently employed bank some cash. Welcome to L.S. :waving:

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