broadleaf weed control.

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by ccash, Mar 21, 2007.

  1. ccash

    ccash Banned
    Posts: 147

    Is there any good broadleaf weed control during spring transition? I just picked up a couple new customers and they have lots of weeds.
     
  2. group501

    group501 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 173

    Speed Zone works well in cooler temps.
     
  3. ccash

    ccash Banned
    Posts: 147

    i know what generally works but what is safe during spring transition is what i need to know.
     
  4. cemars

    cemars LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 387

    If you know what generally works then you should know what is safe!
     
  5. JayDawgnh

    JayDawgnh LawnSite Member
    Posts: 7

    I use Cool power when its cool, horsepower in the heat .

    edit Cool power likes to evap in the heat and kill tree's... Horsepower is the solution.
     
  6. Victor

    Victor LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,430

    Under normal circumstances ccash, you would have had tons of members helping you out by now. Since you stated that you weren't licensed in the thread titled 'How to Grow Thick, Green Grass?' though, a lot of members (me included) aren't going to give you the information you seek.

    The majority of licensed applicators in this forum refuse to help someone like you who's trying to circumvent the law, because its just not convenient for them to put forth the time, money and effort required to become a licensed applicator.

    The fact that you're unlicensed, but are trying to get help from people who do play by the rules is undoubtedly why Cemars gave you that abrasive response to your question. If you were licensed, but just didn't know the answer to that question, I, like many others here, would follow you to the end of the earth to help you out. Helping someone like you break the law though, because they just don't want to do it right, is where many of us draw the line.

    The funny part about your dilemma, is that you'd almost undoubtedly know the answer to your question had you studied enough to get your license. Do yourself a favor and get your license before you get caught.

    This thread brings to mind a kid who came in here not long ago. This kid had been doing illegal applications like you are. He started a thread, asking what the sanctions were for getting caught doing pesticide applications without a license. When some members asked him if he was licensed, he resolutely stated that he was. Well... As it turned out, one of the members of this forum called his local Dept. of Agriculture and checked to see if that kid was licensed. As it turned out, he wasn't. The next day, that kid was back on here with his tail between his legs, because his local Dept. of Agriculture office had notified him that they were going to be paying him a visit the next day. The next thing you know, he was in here begging for advice from us on what to do to save his butt.

    I don't think the member that placed the initial call to that kid's Dept. of Ag. meant to get him in trouble, but be warned that you could find yourself in the exact same situation if you're not careful. While I'm not going to call your Dept of Ag., there's a chance that one of your local competitors MIGHT try to call and report you.

    What I said in this post is obviously going to ruffle your feathers, but this information might save you an expensive fine.
     
  7. ccash

    ccash Banned
    Posts: 147


    WRONG, No where in that thread did I state that I was not licensend i simply was argueing the fact that you did not need a license to put out fert!!
    so read the thread. and yes I know what kills beoadleaf weeds But i keep all of my lawns in good enough shape that I never had to spray any during spring transition.
     
  8. ccash

    ccash Banned
    Posts: 147

    so sorry to ruffle your feathers there Vic. I guess to disagree means I am an a hole.
     
  9. LawnsRUsInc.

    LawnsRUsInc. LawnSite Senior Member
    from midwest
    Posts: 916

    Speed zone is what i would recommend but ask your provider "lesco" they are there to help also
     
  10. Victor

    Victor LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,430

    If you really are licensed, then I'm sorry for misreading what you said in the aforementioned post. From my point of view, its pretty hard to believe that someone who volunteers at their local Ag. extension office (like you claimed you did in that thread) wouldn't know what was safe to use in your own area this time of year. The people that you'd be rubbing shoulders with at your local Ag. extension office would be a great resource for that information.

    Its also hard to believe that a licensed applicator wouldn't be cognizant of the basic licensing requirements in their own state. You DID incorrectly claim in that thread that you only need to be licensed to apply restricted use pesticides in your state. Something just doesn't add up here.

    There have been more than a couple of guys that have come on here, claiming to be licensed, when in fact they weren't. I obviously don't know you from Adam. Maybe you really are licensed and like I said before, if you are, then I apologize.

    If you fall into the same category as the kid I told you about, take heed in the warning I gave you, as it was meant to help you avoid the nasty situation he fell into. The kid that I told you about is only one of a few that have come on here making that claim, only to be turned in by their local competitors.

    You didn't ruffle my feathers ccash and I don't think you're an a hole. :)
     

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