Burn marks after trimming shrubs

Discussion in 'Landscape Maintenance' started by QuadRacer041, Jul 14, 2009.

  1. QuadRacer041

    QuadRacer041 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 364

    Why do the ends of the plants sometimes turn brown almost like a burn mark after I trim shrubs? Mostly evergreens. Blades on my hedgetrimmers are sharp. I've npticed this at house other then ones I maintane as well.
     
  2. markahurley

    markahurley LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 252

    a lot of times it depends on the type of shrubs. certain shrubs are so resilient, they never show these "burn marks" (holly, etc.) what the "burn marks" really are, at least in my experience, are partially sheared leaves--some leaves die when partially sheared, some don't. depends on the shrub.

    another possibility is the blade lubrication--if you use an oil based lubricant, this can cause dead spots on shrubs as well. i have a buddy who uses vegetable oil to lubricate his blades to prevent that. whatever works!
     
  3. Stillwater

    Stillwater LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,806

    pretty much what Mark said, use razor sharp blades, no slop in blades, use fluid film for lube, on plants you know you will have a issue with do not trim them on days over 75 80/ (try anyways) spray plants with hose right after trimming. give those browned shrubs a very slight re trim they should look better. a hydrated shrub is less likely to brown than a thirsty one. Sometimes it is impossible to avoid you can do all of the above and it still can happen. It is also important to trim at high speed using trimmer blades and not restorative blades
     
  4. DuallyVette

    DuallyVette LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,998

    When you trim shrubbery, the foliage that you remove WAS protecting the foliage underneath it from direct sun rays. When the sun beats down on foliage that was previously protected, the sun can scorch it. Wetting the foliage of some plants during a hot sunny day can also scorch the foliage.

    spf 30+ will work :)
     
  5. Stillwater

    Stillwater LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,806

    I can't think of a shrub that is trimmed with hedge trimmers that would be scorched by water. What species is scorched by water
     
  6. DuallyVette

    DuallyVette LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,998

    YEA THAT'S RIGHT...water scouches stuff :hammerhead:

    I said that "wetting the foliage of some plants during a hot sunny day can also scorch the foliage." This is most evident with many annual flowers. I added this observation because someone recommended wetting the shrubbery in order to possibly lessen the effect of browning on newly trimmed shrubbery. I think that wetting the TENDER foliage after trimming...on a hot sunny day...may do more harm. soaking the roots should help the plants recover more quickly.

    OH ....just tell me your 14 years old...and don't know what state you live in yet...
     
  7. Stillwater

    Stillwater LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,806

    No not 14.... but I wish I was,, been in business since 1979 serving southern MA. I live on Martha's Vineyard. do you know where that is? Why the hostile attatude did I offend you? if so I apoligize that was not my intent.
     
  8. QuadRacer041

    QuadRacer041 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 364

    I do use wd40 to lubricate the blades, maybe thats part of the problem. Stillwater, what is fluid film? Mark you are right too, the burn is usually on the partially cut leaves.
     
  9. Stillwater

    Stillwater LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,806

    Hey quad, fluid film is a advanced lanolin based lube developed by the US. Navy now it is widely used in the agricultural industry. go to lawnsites home page down to where the sponsor forums are and click on the fluid film logo I think his name is dan the monitor he will send you a free can to try.
     
  10. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,654

    I think it has likely to do with trimming the plants this time of the year,
    they'll do better when trimmed in spring or in fall but I also think some
    browning is inevitable.
     

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