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business license question

Discussion in 'Business Operations' started by kevhov, Nov 15, 2007.

  1. kevhov

    kevhov LawnSite Member
    Posts: 56

    I'm in South Carolina and the State and County does not issue business licences for service based businesses. Do you guys operate this way. I want to be legit but I don't see how all of these other lco advertise licensed and insured if they don't even issue them unless you're in the city of Greenville (where I'm at). What do I do?
  2. Nosmo

    Nosmo LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    In my city a person must have a business license if it sells something to eat or drink. No other type of business must have a city license.

    Next comes the state (Oklahoma) no license is required to mow grass for hire . I'm not sure if insurance is required or not but it would be best to have it.

    An applicator must have a (Oklahoma State) license to apply pesticides (not sure about herbicides) for hire.

    Probably what the Licensed and Insured means in your example is that person is Licensed by the state to apply pesticides and herbicides and has liability insurance. This has a much better appearance on a business card or flyer than the part time low baller's sign on the truck.

  3. LushGreenLawn

    LushGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,121

    Herbicides are Pesticides. You are confusing Pesticide with Inceticide. Pesticide covers any chemical that claims to kill a pest. Even bleach (germicide) is a pesticide.
  4. Charles

    Charles Moderator Staff Member
    Posts: 7,884

    In all my years of doing this, rarely has anyone ever asked me if I am licensed or insured. That may be a drawback in mowing to advertise that way in the residential department because many may think you are higher priced.
  5. Nosmo

    Nosmo LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    I might have them confused but what would you call 2,4-D ? There are 5-counties in western Oklahoma which have a ban on the Herbicide 2,4-D for use only in certain times of the year.

    I do know a person must be licensed to apply a insecticide for hire in Oklahoma. Example termite company. Or spraying in an pecan orchard for web worms.

    I'm not sure if a herbicide license is required (but should be) to apply Roundup and yard chemicals for hire. If I wanted to go next door and help my neighbor spray and had the chemical I believe I could without being licensed if I was not hired.

    To tell you the truth I don't know of anyone checking on licenses in our area.

  6. Nosmo

    Nosmo LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    This thread is getting a little bit deeper but I am going to pose a question .

    Charles said in all his years he has never been asked if he is licensed or insured.

    Question -- You are mowing a yard for hire and the next door neighbor's wife walks out her front door. You make a pass on your mower and pick up a wedge shaped rock with your blades. The rock hits the woman and sticks in her head killing her instantly.

    You have no insurance and were not asked if you have any when you picked this customer up. The widower sues for wrongful death and funeral expenses. He wins the case and gets judgment against who ??????

  7. JimmyStew

    JimmyStew LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 367

    He didn't say he wasn't licensed or insured, just that he has never been asked. I don't think that is uncommon in residential work.
  8. Nosmo

    Nosmo LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    What I am trying to stress is that any homeowner should ask any contractor about his insurance. If the homeowner doesn't ask or let's him do the work and the contractor is uninsured the homeowner is liable for any damages.

    An LCO is a contractor even if he is cutting one time or on a regular basis.

    Believe it or not if you hire one to work for you and he is uninsured and he sets his gas can between your house and your neighbor's and it causes a fire and burns your neighbor's house your insurance company is gonna get sued (or you if you don't have any).


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