Buying Lawn Maint. Accounts?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Craig, Nov 23, 2000.

  1. Craig

    Craig LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 7

    Dear Board,

    I am located in NJ and currently looking to start my own landscaping business. I would like to begin to purchase landscaping accounts. How do I acess how much each account is worth and how much I should buy it for ( ie 1x earnings etc). Finally what are some key issues to make sure the account I am purchasing is a good buy?
    Also I noticed many landscapers have a regular pickup and a trailer. What do they do with all the grass clippings? They don't have a dump truck to put them in. Is it possible to start a landscaping business with out a dump truck. Again where do the clippings go?

    Thank You,
    Craig DeMaio
     
  2. CCLC

    CCLC LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 261

    The only advice I have as far as buying accounts is don't. With money that you spend buying these you could advertise and have better results. We don't collect lawn clippings except for a few special properties. You don't need a dump truck to start out either. I started with a 2 wheel drive 1/2 ton, trailer, and a walk behind. Good Luck on your start up. Have a great Thanksgiving.
     
  3. Bob Shoaff

    Bob Shoaff LawnSite Member
    Posts: 64

    I would definately not waste the money buying any accounts. Once you buy them there is no guarantee that they will stay with you. It is alot better to market your business via newspapers, signs on your truck, fliers, etc. Once you start building a reputation then more work will come without the extra advertizing. As far as grass clippings, we have a place here that accepts grass clippings for a small fee. Ussually if a customer does not have a place for you to dispose of the clippings in a mulch pile then it is not un-common to charge a small fee monthly to help cover your expense of dumping or simply build it into the cost of the mowing. I did not start out with a dump truck but this year I am purchasing a 5 tonn hydraulic dump trailer. It hauls alot more then a truck and can obviously be used with many different vehicles. The best advice I can give is to be positive, do a good job, and keep your prices reasonable and you will see your business grow. Good luck.
     
  4. Eric ELM

    Eric ELM Husband, Father, Friend, Angel
    Posts: 4,831

    Welcome to Lawnsite.com and I hope you both enjoy this Forum. Bob, I posted on the other thread you started and emailed you also. Check your email.

     
  5. jeffyr

    jeffyr LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 876

    Craig,

    I'm from NJ too. What part of NJ are you from?

    jeffyr
     
  6. bob

    bob LawnSite Platinum Member
    from DE
    Posts: 4,254

    If you must buy lawn accounts, the going rate in my area is about 2 months gross. Just starting out, I would build my own business up first,then maybe purchase lawn accounts. Use the search feature on this web site to assist you.
     
  7. Twotoros

    Twotoros LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 494

    Two months gross is what many go for here . I did it and is not worth it .Also customers don't like being traded like trading cards . 2/3's have a very big issue with this and you have to constantly prove yuorself to them the whole season . Spend the money on 3 or 4 types of advertising instead . If you must buy some don't spend over a months gross and both you and the seller talk to each customer in person together.
     
  8. Nathan

    Nathan LawnSite Member
    Posts: 193

    You may not want to hear this, but to be perfectly honest it sounds like now isn't the right time for you to start your own business. I am not saying this to keep you out of the industry. If you don't know some of these few simple aspects of the business you are probably missing a ton of major things that would mean the success or failure of your startup. Your best bet is to go work for a company that you see doing well and that you have appreciation for the way their accounts look. It is pretty easy to get hired even if you have no experience, with the labor shortage. Once you are in be very inquisitive and try to learn as much as possible, even pry into the bidding and financial matters if you can. You will quickly see how much you didn't know and will probably also be able to tell when it is time to break away and go on your own.
    Good luck.
     

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