CA water story

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by FIMCO-MEISTER, Sep 18, 2009.

  1. In a vineyard and orchard setting, specially the newer acreage introduced in the last 15 years, a form of low volume or drip is used as it would be impractical to use flood or spraying (impact sprinklers) due to slopes\grade especially when you see farming being done close or on mountain ranges.

    In flatter area, flooding via v ditches or irrigation by rolling impact sprinkler or portable galvanized pipe is used for row crops such as corn, cotton, tomatoes, ect.....

    John
     
  2. it's blind statements like this one that put farmers against fish, farmers against city folks ect....

    The simple truth is man and our intrusion into the cycle.

    Our fisheries were never meant to be pressured by the techniques used by modern fishing boats.

    Climate change is another contributing factor.

    Man building where man wasn't before. Heck, look at all the building being done in such old sierra towns such as Jackson, Angels Camp, Sutters Creek, heck even The big Blue Lake of Lake Tahoe.

    Farming has been around a lot longer than many and I mean many cities that exist today. Have you seen Cities like Stockton, Fresno, Bakersfield how big they have gotten? Many of these places, areas that I remember as farm land and dove hunting areas are now homes. Heck, even San Jose use to be all Peach and Cherry groves. What are they now?

    There plenty of blame to go around. Trying to pin it on one source of the problem doesn't do anything to correct the problem in the first place. People seem to forget that genraly speaking, CA is an arid state in the first place.

    John
     
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  4. Selenium is a natural occurring compound in soil, just like Anthrax. The problem was that the Selenium was so concentrated in the soil, when the farmers would irrigate their Fields using flood techniques, leaching would occur,the excess water would eventually find it's way through the various surrounding rivers and into the ocean. This was true in the Los Banos area where many places to the east of town are natural occurring swamp lands. This area is part of the Pacific Coast flyway for waterfowl. Ducks would stop in the local refuge and stay. Because of the high Selenium concentration in the water, birth defects would occur in the ducks. This has been pretty much corrected now due to efforts by Ducks Unlimited, Ca and Fed EPA and of course, local farmers.

    Most of the cost was born by people who buy food and of course, us tax payers.
     
  5. 1idejim

    1idejim LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,343

    john,

    my comment about the dam was more of an observation than anything.

    the fish count was printed daily in the local newspaper.

    i won't make any further comments on this issue as until the ladder was installed i don't think a better or more accurate method of counting the fish was available.

    btw the salmon spawning canal splits the alfalfa fields from the pasture on my brother in laws ranch.

    can't remember the last time it had water in it.

    jim
     
  6. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,415

    I had assumed those particular farms were using flood irrigation, and might have turned towards drip as a way to not have so much water to pump away. Weird how they had to first cope with the birth-defects problem by chasing birds out of the wetlands, so they wouldn't nest, and come to harm.
     
  7. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    $$$$$

    Easier said than done.
     
  8. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,415

    Hey, as long as you can dump your pollution onto the public at large, what's to worry about? :rolleyes:
     
  9. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    Oh, it gets worse.

    http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/p1646/
     
  10. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,923

    I believe it was last year that they had the worst salmon run in history on the Sacramento; fishing was curtailed and it affected fishermen all the way up the coast.
     

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