1. Missed the live Ask the Expert event?
    Not to worry. Check out the archived thread of the Q&A with Ken Hutcheson, President of U.S. Lawns, and the LawnSite community on the Franchising Forum.

    Dismiss Notice

California Water Problem's

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by agrostis, Jan 15, 2014.

  1. bcg

    bcg LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Tx
    Posts: 1,836

    Seems like it would be a whole lot easier to build a water pipeline from the San Diego or Los Angeles coast to their respective water purveyors than to build a new one from Northern California. The logistics of getting water from the beach to the tap are a whole lot less daunting than getting it from Sacramento to San Diego.

    And the production costs of desal should be irrelevant, if you want to live in a desert you need to expect your water to be expensive instead of stealing it from other areas so it can be cheap/subsidized.
     
  2. SoCalLandscapeMgmt

    SoCalLandscapeMgmt LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,699

    Which brings up another interesting statistic.... 22% of all of the electricity used in the state of CA is used to pump and move water throughout the state. Desalination while good in theory will further tax our already strained power grid.
     
  3. bcg

    bcg LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Tx
    Posts: 1,836

    You guys need more power plants anyway, and have for a long time. I was working a contract in SF in 2000 - 2001 and remember the rolling blackouts that summer and know that there havn't been any new plants built since then. Those face the same challenges that desal, or this water project, face with the environmental concerns though. At some point you're all going to die of hunger, freezing in a cave if you don't do something... lol

    But seriously, with the power requirements of desal plants, it would make sense to do like a lot of the refineries do in Texas and Louisiana and just build on-site power generation so that the grid is unaffected. Again though, the environmental groups will make that very difficult, even though it is a better environmental decision than continuing to divert the water from the delta.
     
  4. SoCalLandscapeMgmt

    SoCalLandscapeMgmt LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,699

    Yep. Seems that no matter what type of plant anybody wants to build and no matter where they want to build it, somebody get's all worked up and objects. SCE just shut down San Onofre nuclear plant and although that wasn't a huge source of power it's one more plant that has been taken offline. They tried to build a bunch of solar out in the desert but the environmental activists got all worked up. It's pretty much an all around effed up situation!
     
  5. AZ LawnSprinklerDrip

    AZ LawnSprinklerDrip LawnSite Member
    Posts: 26

    Moved away from the Delta 25 years ago. Still miss it. Culturally speaking, a million miles away from the Bay Area and L.A. One thing to point out, an average rainfall/snow pack year only exists on paper. Very wet years followed by very dry years. Usually nothing in between. Now would be the best time for maintenance/strengthening of the existing system
     
  6. Crimson Lawn

    Crimson Lawn LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 319

    Charles, There was light talk about an El Nino event this year. But very light at that. Also, its no guarantee that a moderate El Nino will bring those storms. The West Coast has been plagued by a warm body of water off the North West Coast, South of Alaska, that helped that huge ridge form. When that ridge broke down that finally got a little bit of moisture. Also, look as to how warm it has been up in Alaska. Only when that ridge broke down did it finally get cold there. That ridge in the west will return as well as the persistent trough in the east.

    Kiril,
    Why cant they just flum it to the reservoirs. Desal is great but there would need to be a natural way to regionalize the water quality to the area. Maybe by flumes like TVA does it and generate power as it is moved.

    SoCal,
    I have reading about California's decommissioning of several generating facilities for a few years. The Nuc's, Coal, Natural Gas I understand but the Hydro. Think about all the water and power needed now all in the effort to return to natures way. Somebody better come up with some agreements and way that will support crops and the environment. Hydrogen generation technology hooked up desalination plants?
     
  7. Crimson Lawn

    Crimson Lawn LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 319

    To early for me to think like that. Apologize for the grammar mistakes.
     
  8. Man go away for a week to be by my wife's bed side(in a coma, has parainfluenza) and this place takes a dive.

    Really, removing salt....to much money.

    Why hasn't this been discussed.....recycle our effluent? They already do this type of purification, the technology is already in place, and its quite cheap.

    City of San Jose waste processing center dumps its treated water into the San Francisco Bay, the Alviso estuary. The water that the plant was processing was:
    fit for human consumption
    was so clean that it was affecting the fish that were use to the dirty delta and San Francisco Bay water.

    But guess nobody wants to drink there purified urine and feces. To gross for many but is done already.

    The problem with some water is the metals that can still be there in the treated water, however the San Jose plant beat this problem.

    That's the way to go really.

    John
     
  9. 1idejim

    1idejim LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,810

    Take care of your wife john. You can solve the worlds problems later, they'll still be there.

    Best of luck to you and yours.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  10. BrandonV

    BrandonV LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,117

    Best wishes with the wife situation. I can imagine how stressful that could be.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     

Share This Page