Can an ametuer install a sprinkler system for a 5,000 SF lawn?

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by ericlemson, Jun 13, 2006.

  1. ericlemson

    ericlemson LawnSite Member
    Posts: 173

    Im am looking to install a sprinkler system in my yard. A couple of things I wanted to know were:

    1) Can a begineer DIYer install it?
    2) I have a fairly nice Bermuda lawn and DO NOT want to have trenches or lines of no grass throughout the yard where the lines were buried, is that possible?
    3) Average cost for a 5,000 sf lawn?
    4) Should I have it professionally done?

    Any other personal experiences, tips or suggestions of who/how/what to use are greatly appreciated.

  2. Randy J

    Randy J LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,124

    You can Eric, but it's probably worth the money to have a professional do it. You'll need to know water pressure, flow rate, pressure loss due to elevation (though probably not much of a problem on 5000sf lawn), how best to zone your yard - based on turf & plantings, sprinkler head flow rate, etc., as well as how to best position your heads for maximum efficiency. After that it's easy! :)
    I'm sure you can rent a turf slicer (don't know a better term - but it basically slices the turf off in a small strip), dig your trench put the lines in and then replace the turf strip. If you're intent on doing it yourself, Home Depot and Lowes (used to) have booklets that walk you through gathering the required information which you then return. Then they help you design the system.
  3. Greenohio

    Greenohio LawnSite Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 19

    I agree with the Randy, although we are fairly new in the business world, my husband has been doing installs for 10 years with a school and personal. I think once you get the vitol info (pressure, zones etc...) the pipe laying(LOL) isnt hard, just a big job. You can get a sod cutter and cut your sod, trench, lie in pipe and then cover over with your sod.

    I'm def. no pro- my husband could help more...I am just peeking in!

  4. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    The plow boys will now speak up. :)
  5. Flow Control

    Flow Control LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,267

    I am more surprised that a person from the midwest advised trenching then any other comment made. Wise man once said you can do anything you put your mind too. Just study up and ask for any help or advice you may need.
  6. paolaken

    paolaken LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 699

    vibra the pipe in. bermuda will heal itself real quick.
  7. Dirt Boy

    Dirt Boy LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 487

    You should consider having a pro help you. At least you could pay them for laying it out, making sure your zones, etc. are right, possibly even have them plow the pipe in for you, then you could do all the "work" of installing heads, etc.
    Doing it wrong is expensive and would prove unsatisfactory for yourself as well.
    Saving a few bucks isn't worth it in the long run.

    OTOH, you could go work for someone for a little of nothing for a few weekends, etc. in turn for them helping you either to learn how to do it, or for their assistance.

  8. Good luck on finding a contractor who will plow in your pipe in the greenville/greer area. If you are on either CPW , Greenville water system or Blue Ridge your pressure will vary through out the county but an average will be in the 100 psi range. I am booked up until the end of August on installs. If you can wait until the end of August on a install I am more than happy too provide you with an estimate. What area of Greer are you located in?
  9. ericlemson

    ericlemson LawnSite Member
    Posts: 173

    I am on CPW. I live near Riverside highschool.

    I like the idea of going and working with someone for a couple weekends as sort of an "apprentice".

    Thanks for you help everyone!
  10. Randy J

    Randy J LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,124

    You'll probably have fun with it. Just remember the physical install isn't as big a deal as laying it out properly so that the system is efficient without dry or overwatering spots.

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