Can I apply Lime to new sod?

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by gscone, Oct 8, 2003.

  1. gscone

    gscone LawnSite Member
    from NY
    Posts: 81

    Should lime be applied to the soil or directly on top of the sod when I lay down some sod this weekend? Thanks!
     
  2. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    Actually, it should be worked into the soil, first, for new sod. Why are you doing this? Are the test results back? Do they show low PH?
     
  3. gscone

    gscone LawnSite Member
    from NY
    Posts: 81

    I just put down some dylox on my lawn and now lifted out all the dead grass (about 10' x 20"). I tilled the soil and was thinking about putting down some lime as recommended by a local nursery, then starter fertilzer and then the sod. Is this procedure correct?
     
  4. Team Gopher

    Team Gopher LawnSite Platinum Member
    from -
    Posts: 4,041

  5. T.E.

    T.E. LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 799

    Just have bobbygedd come over and take look at the soil. He can tell by looking at the soil if it needs lime! :D
     
  6. bobbygedd

    bobbygedd LawnSite Fanatic
    from NJ
    Posts: 10,178

    very funny te. the point was, my common sense tells me if i need to even take a soil test. if i see an area surrounded by oak trees, i am usually positive the ph is low. on the other hand, if i see what appears to be good soil, and there is good grass on the property, but perhaps the homeowner didnt get a certain area seeded or sodded, and now wants to do so, i dont even bother testing. i dont live in an area where we get 150 days of rain a year, so soil types are pretty standard and workable. and common sense, like i said, just looking at whats going on in the area, will be the first step . so kiss my buuttttttt!:eek:
     
  7. bobbygedd

    bobbygedd LawnSite Fanatic
    from NJ
    Posts: 10,178

    very funny te. the point was, my common sense tells me if i need to even take a soil test. if i see an area surrounded by oak trees, i am usually positive the ph is low. on the other hand, if i see what appears to be good soil, and there is good grass on the property, but perhaps the homeowner didnt get a certain area seeded or sodded, and now wants to do so, i dont even bother testing. i dont live in an area where we get 150 days of rain a year, so soil types are pretty standard and workable. and common sense, like i said, just looking at whats going on in the area, will be the first step . so kiss my buuttttttt!:eek:
     

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