Cat 277 belly pan

Discussion in 'Accurate Machinery' started by accurate machinery, Jun 12, 2008.

  1. accurate machinery

    accurate machinery LawnSite Member
    Posts: 165

    This is the belly of a Cat 277 that I brokered about a week ago. This baby is dry! No signs of any leaks, maybe it is just a tub with no where for the oil to leak out. I like that it is so straight and that it is so high as well, lots of ground clearance. From this vantage point it is pretty easy to see the inside groups of rollers, the amount of chunking in the rubber and of course if there were any missing rollers. A good thing to do at this point is to roll the machine forward so that the rollers each roll 180 degrees to see the other side. From this camera angle you can't see the rear most idlers, they are the most prone to chunking and needing replaced before the rest of the rollers.

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  2. BIGBEN2004

    BIGBEN2004 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 823

    I love the 277's, they were the best in my opinion. They had great power but could also almost walk on water with the super low PSI that they put down. Tracks and rollers were expensive to replace though.
     
  3. accurate machinery

    accurate machinery LawnSite Member
    Posts: 165

    Hey BIGBEN2004! I like your post, always looking on the bright side. However, I can't be as nice to the Cat, I can't get past the $$$ for undercarriage replacement. I will be the first to admit that the ride is second to none, the ground speed is nice and the quiet hydrostatics are operator friendly. I have even said that I would buy a Cat rubber tire skid steer for my own use. But anyone should seriously consider the work application before going with the molded rubber cog track with squirrel cage sprocket and rubber coated rollers. I have heard (haven't done it myself) that a replacement can be over $14K!!! Sure you will have to replace the rollers and idlers on conventional track machines, but not nearly as often. I put a new Berco UC on a Cat 953 for $12K (a few years ago).
    On the earlier post I mentioned that the rear idlers and rollers wear more, I found these pictures of one of my Cat 257s. Look at the front idler versus the rear rollers, my assumption is as you travel forward the stones and debris drift to the rear of the tracks and eat up the rear idlers the most. My guess is that the Cat U/C is fine if you don't put it in the dirt.....

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  4. BIGBEN2004

    BIGBEN2004 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 823

    The 267 and 277 undercarrige were the most money to replace. When I worked at Valley Excavating they traded their entire fleet of skid loaders in on 267's 277's and 287's. We all liked them but after 200 Hrs or so they all needed tracks and the bills were unbelievable. The owner didn't like the fact that a 953 loader lasted in upwards of 3000 Hrs before needing replacing and that it was cheaper then the MTL's so he called Alban to come out and get every track machine and bring out all tire machines again. The biggest thing that destroyed the rollers and tracks were #2 stones. That was the main thing that is on job sites so it was impossible to keep them out of the stones. They are hard to justify owning since it seems most profits go back in to replacing the tracks and undercarriage. I still love the 277 in soft muddy conditions, they just seem to float over the mud and keep going. Also I found a website that sells replacement parts for these tracks including lugs for the tracks which are nice since they tend to get ripped off easy.


    http://bairproductsinc.com/products/part_ll.html

    This might be a good site to keep on file for you unless you already know about it. Well take a look and see what you think.
     
  5. accurate machinery

    accurate machinery LawnSite Member
    Posts: 165

    BIGBEN Good post, I had looked over the Larry Lugs before, it just shouldn't be needed. The Cat track is a smooth riding but lightweight design.
     

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