Cat 430e It

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment & Pavement' started by jazak, Jun 20, 2006.

  1. jazak

    jazak LawnSite Senior Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 843

    Has anyone tried it yet? What did you like or didn't about it? What are the differences from the 430D IT?
     
  2. jazak

    jazak LawnSite Senior Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 843

    Has anyone tried it?
     
  3. Tigerotor77W

    Tigerotor77W LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Germany
    Posts: 1,891

    I tried one today... um, there are a LOT of differences. Since I have to leave now, I'll have to get back to you on this one -- I'm sure the others may have an idea. I can get back to this post either later tonight or tomorrow night.
     
  4. Tigerotor77W

    Tigerotor77W LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Germany
    Posts: 1,891

    I'll try to tackle the differences... but keep in mind that the E-series represents the first fundamental change in BHL design for Cat since the curved boom (B-series) -- so there may well be things I don't even know.

    Also -- I'm spending most of this reply on the differences of the machines, not what you're looking for. Is your choice between a used 430D and a new 430E? What do you plan to do with the machine? Is a BHL the best choice, or is a SSL-mini-ex a better suit? Will you need work tools? Who is your best local dealer? These questions deserve significant attention as well.

    Backhoe:

    The outer section of the Estick now slides, as with Deere and Case. However, unlike those two designs, the E-stick does not require grease: it is a greaseless design, made possible by rubber wear wedges inside the stick. These wedges are impregnated with grease to require no greasing. Furthermore, if the wedges need to be shimmed to account for wear, doing so takes only about 15 minutes (if I recall correctly), rather than two hours.

    The boom nose has been strengthed.

    There is one pin for the stick and boom cylinders, reducing the number of grease points.

    THe swing casting has been reinforced and redesigned, and has replaceable bushings.

    A serrated edge on the stick (E-stick or standard) allows for clamping of material with the bucket and the underside of the stick.

    Replacement boom foot plates protect the underside of the boom.

    The boom lock has been upgraded so that you can use the stick to lift. It also engages and disengages easier.

    Loader:

    The loader arms have been strengthened in key areas to reduce the chance of loader arm failures.

    Cab

    The cab has been significantly upgraded. It is now easier to spin the seat without hitting your knees on the side panels, the dashboard is narrower, and more vents allow for more airflow. Pilot joysticks are still standard, but the control for the E-stick is now a thumb wheel on the right joystick -- roll up to move stick out; down to move stick in. The pattern change lever has been moved from the left fender area to inside the cab, allowing for on-the-go pattern changes from Deere to Cat or vice-versa. The joysticks are redesigned, giving a better feel. Overall, the cab has a better fit-and-finish, and appears more automotive.

    Powertrain

    For the 430E (in the US and Canada), the torque converter has grown larger, allowing for greater rimpull.

    Brakes have been improved to address the poor brake life and performance of D-series machines.

    New valves in the transmission have been added to promote smoother shifts.

    New rear axles are larger and stronger and have outboard planetary gearsets.

    (Lumping servicability here as well...)

    The entire engine hood tips up, allowing for one-sided access to common service points.

    Air cleaner is of a better design.

    Cab fresh air filter is accessable from ground level.

    I'd like to say that those are the most significant changes, but keep in mind the strong features of the D-series (smooth joysticks, good digging forces, brake mode selector, good cab) have been either retained or improved. I operated a 430D last fall, and had the chance to do some digging (backhoe) today with a 420E. The 420E digs really well -- very smooth, and it seemed to have more power than the 430D (it could be because soil conditions may have been different). The joysticks seemed to be smoother, the cab quieter (even with both doors open), and visibility was great down to the trench (due to window changes).

    Overall, I think the E-series is best in class. Of course that's just the opinion of an engineering student, but I certainly consider it a step up from the D-series, which was already a decent product.

    Good luck -- we're always around to answer questions. :)

    Edit: you can always view the E-series literature at http://govbidspec.cat.com/cda/layout?m=39620&x=7
     
  5. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 837

    :dizzy: :dizzy: :dizzy: :dizzy:

    and don't complain about the service on lawnsite:rolleyes: :clapping: :clapping:

    Xing, if this site had a rep points system you'd be buried.
     
  6. jazak

    jazak LawnSite Senior Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 843

    What????:dizzy:
     
  7. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 837

    I was referring to the fact that you could hardly gey a more comprehensive answer if you tried. An excellent post.
     
  8. jazak

    jazak LawnSite Senior Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 843

    Ohh a thought you were making fun of him for making such a long post and giving so much info. Sorry :)
     
  9. Tigerotor77W

    Tigerotor77W LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Germany
    Posts: 1,891

    Haha, squiz, thanks! If I ever visit Australia, with Cat or otherwise, I'll pay you a visit.

    jazak, any insight on the questions I had posed about your machine requirements?
     
  10. 2109 Stang

    2109 Stang LawnSite Member
    Posts: 136

    Ive been reading your posts for quite some time ,and wanted to thank you for all the info you provide to site for all of us .
     

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