Cedar Lodge Farms photo/video thread

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment & Pavement' started by farmerknowsbest, Apr 6, 2009.

  1. P.Services

    P.Services LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,322

    What do you do with the rinse water that still has chemicals in it? The last rinse may be clean water but what about the first rinse? Do you go out and spray it?
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  2. farmerknowsbest

    farmerknowsbest LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 350

    Just respray a portion of the field. Generally will do all the rinsing in the field across the road from the farm. Do the first triple rinse in the last field sprayed, come home, do the rinse with ammonia, spray it out, triple rinse again in the field.

    Warren
     
  3. agrostis

    agrostis LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,268

    Farmerknowsbest - Thanks for the reply. You want a 120 ft. boom. That is gigantic. Even a 80 ft. boom is a very wide swath. I think my sprayer was 17.5 ft. How do you control your spray pattern? It has to be mighty difficult to see the end of your booms. I used a colorant to help me see what had been sprayed. i would bet you don't. Is the wind a problem? What PSI do you spray at? Sorry about all the questions but your set-up is impressive and i want to know how you do it.
     
  4. farmerknowsbest

    farmerknowsbest LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 350

    My sprayer is far from impressive, but it does work well. I spray 4-5000ac a year, so 80ft is awfully narrow at the peak times!

    GPS. Auto boom control. GPS maps coverage and turns the sections on and off automatically. GPS steers the sprayer automatically to keep things straight and square. This is my 7th year spraying and I'm proud to say I've never used foam.

    Wind is absolutely an issue. I spray a great deal from 10pm to 2am as it is usually calm at those times. However, some chemical, roundup for instance, are only about 80% effective during those times so rates have to be increased accordingly. I use air induction nozzles. They are long nozzle bodies with 2 holes on the side that suck in air. This reduces the fine spray droplets and makes a nice even medium to coarse spray that resists drift up to a 10mph wind. When the spray beats you to the end of the field it is time to stop. HAHA. I generally try and keep the pressure around 70PSI. The nozzles will work above about 45psi, but the higher the pressure the better the job the nozzles do. Also that means you can go faster. I typically try and spray at 13.5-15mph which is as fast as the machine can go in third gear.

    I have many videos from the operators perspective on my youtube channel.

    Here are a few.

    Spraying aphids, includes loading the sprayer
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRPDQAe0AC4

    This one is neat, I mounted the camera on the boom looking at the machine while spraying. Very cool view.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IN4TJR1iLIc

    This is about as detailed as I can be about what everything in the cab is and its function.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h3cXsb6D3Ho

    Warren
     
  5. farmerknowsbest

    farmerknowsbest LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 350

    You might also find this one interesting. Spraying headline fungicide on tasseled corn. This was a big test plot. 2 varieties, treated untreated on both a tiled (underdrained) and non tiled field.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTwPCknY48s&feature=relmfu

    The only time we've seen a huge economic advantage to this treatment is after a massive weather event. In 2006 we had a terrible hail storm rip through about 200ac of corn. There was a 38bu per acre advantage treated over non treated. On healthy corn, there is no economic advantage at this time. Testing continues on a yearly basis.

    Warren
     
  6. P.Services

    P.Services LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,322

    why cant you just put a larger tank on the sprayer you have so you can stay out longer? that cant be that hard to do?
     
  7. farmerknowsbest

    farmerknowsbest LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 350

    Final drives wouldn't take it. I'm blowing a hyd line or 2 a year now as it is. Would start to twist drive shafts and other more serious things if you increased the weight of the machine. If I were to modify this machine, it would be add about 5ft to each boom to go up to 90. I'd rather run a machine that was designed to be big than patch together a machine.

    Warren
     
  8. agrostis

    agrostis LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,268

    Farmerknowsbest - GPS steers and turns the booms on and off. Very nice!
    FYI - On a golf course in the southeast you might have to spray the bentgrass(cool season grass) putting greens with a preventative fungicide every 14 - 21 days.You might spray a curative rate of insecticide 1 -3 times a year. Fertilizer at low rates maybe every 2 weeks. This is on a area of about 1 3/4 acre. At speeds of 3-4 Mph. The rest of the course is hybrid Bermuda grass(warm season grass) with no treatment needed except for fertilizer and winter weeds.

    I looked at your videos - very informative - I really liked the boom cam and i got a kick out of your comment about the spray reaching the end of the field before the sprayer. You sure do go fast when you spray. But when you have that much to spray you need speed.

    I saw the two demo sprayers in your pictures. They looked like they were nice and expensive. But i don't think people realize how important plant protectants are.

    So whats your take on GMO crops. Personally i think it is a good idea in a lot of cases. Is it worth to you to plant those seeds? I really don't know the whole story on those plants. But it looks like round-up ready bentgrass got shot down in the U.S. That's no big deal to me but to guys north of me it might have been more important.
     
  9. farmerknowsbest

    farmerknowsbest LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 350

    the planter went from CIH to the JD dealer for a couple days. I brought it home this morning and continued working. It pulls really nicely on the road. I am really liking the narrow transport width. Should really speed up going from field to field.

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    Hardly enough room to fold it out.
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    It is bizarre how much smaller it looks when it is sitting on the ground.
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    I re did the hoses for the air bags. Instead of one continuous loop of 1/4 inch hoses. I broke it up into 3 segments of 8 rows each connected by 1/4 inch lines. The 3 sections are now fed by 3/8th lines for faster response time and pressurized air storage.
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    On Monday I'm going to get a metal shop to make up some pieces of steel that mount on the wheel frame to hold the compressor up behind the CCS hopper.
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    The new hyd driven 20:20 compressor
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    I added the rest of the precision gadgets. 2 more weight sensors on rows. A lift switch. Also got the 20:20 seed sense monitor hooked up and running. That is one sweet monitor.
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    Cleaned up the mess that was under the catwalk of wiring harnesses. It still is a mess, but at least it is easier to follow wires.
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    The hydraulic cooler doesn't block any view of the openers. I'm quite pleased I can see all 24 rows from the seat without much leaning.
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    Warren
     
  10. farmerknowsbest

    farmerknowsbest LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 350

    I have no issue with GMO crops if they are self pollinating. As soon as open pollinators such as grass and alfalfa are released, the gene will spread to all native species like wild fire. That is why Roundup ready lawn seed and roundup ready alfalfa have been banned in Canada and the EU.

    It is basically impossible to buy non GMO corn seed in north america anymore. This year 100% of our corn acres will have the roundup gene. Even the refuge corn. We won't spray roundup on everything, but it sure is nice to have the option as a bailout if conventional herbicides fail.

    As for soybeans, we generally grow about 50% non GMO soybeans in order to get the big price premium. Last year we bit off more than we could chew and grew 80% non GMO and had a hell of a time getting them harvested and shipped as a quality product.

    Warren
     

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