Chain Saw Sharpeners

Discussion in 'Tree Service Equipment' started by Guest, Apr 12, 2011.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    I had my saw shop sharpen my 38" one time just because i was tired of hand sharpening it. I learned the hard way, It was un usuable and had to be thrown away and they gave me a new chain. so I always sharpen everything by hand, if you do it long enough you can do it very quickly. so imo ill take hand sharpening over automatic sharpeners any day.
     
  2. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    I use a Speed Sharp (Italian made) that I got from Baileys ($375). The model I have has a auto chain locker that grips the chain when you pull the handle down but unfortunately Bailey's stopped stocking that model. It saves a little time compared to hand tightening on every link. I disagree with everyone above about filing by hand. It's slow and time consuming and in the hands of a rookie can end a chains career in a hurry! It's much faster to have a couple spare chains in the truck you can swap out in a minute rather than taking 5-20 minutes to sharpen by hand. We sharpen on maintenance/rain days. We also make our own chain (bought in 100 or 150 foot rolls) which saves a ton of money! If money isn't an option and you want the Cadillac of sharpeners get a Silvey (made in USA)!! The biggest difference in Silvey vs most other brands is the motor reverses so you grind both sides of the chain in the same direction which gives a more consistent edge. They also use an 8" grinding wheel compared to the 5 3/4" that most other brands use. The bigger wheel is supposed to sharpen with cooler temps to avoid cutter burning. The down side is that they cost $800! Oregon grinders are made in Italy and are probably made by the same company as Speed Sharp and MAXX. The MAXX model that Bailey's carries has the auto chain clamp and the whole head unit tilts left and right to get the same effect as the Silvey's reversing motor. Don't buy a cheap grinder from Harbor Freight or a hardware store for $35 and expect to get a good sharp chain!
     
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    Like I stated above we sharpen chain on days when we aren't working outside which keeps my guys busy and plenty of sharp chain on deck. Just like sharpening by hand, sharpening with a grinder takes practice. It took me a while to learn the machine and how much pressure to use, ect. I also learned "the old fashioned way" by sharpening by hand for years and can still get a damn sharp chain, but from my experience in both worlds the grinder can do it faster and more consistent than by hand. There's a good reason all chainsaw shops use grinders!
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    Maybe you need to go back and read Tree&Turfs post. He isn't asking what you think about filing chain. He's asking about grinders of which it seems you only have an opinion, not any sound advice.

    (As Flying Squirrel seems to always insist on having the last word I'm going to keep posting replies until he gives up.)
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    I have an Oregon bench mount but I find myself going back to a file. When I need it the most (out in the woods) a few files are always on hand.
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    I am looking for a chain grinder and would welcome advice on a brand and model that will sharpen Stihl and other chains. I currently have 4 saws and it is getting pricy to get them sharpened. I want the best machine for the best price. I am also considering sharpening for the general public to help pay for it. I want a bench mount model.
    Thanks
     
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    WoodsFire knows what he is talking about.
    If time is "of the essence", drop the file and step into the 21'st century.
    If you have absolutely nothing else better to do with your time, file away.
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    It all boils down to personal preference, (just like everything else). When my crew is out gettin' jiggy wit' it, I swap chains at the end of every cord, whether it needs it or not. I'm not cutting wood for entertainment, it's a necesity. Efficency is key to making money in the woods, and it's far more efficienct to swap'em during the day and grind'em once I get back to the house in the evenings. I will concied that no, and I mean NO automation could ever replace hand craftsmanship, (just look at Detroit). I remember setting on the tailgate of my 1977 F250 hand sharpening chains with my late father, they were some of the best times of my life, but my son is only 2 now, and if that saw ain't cuttin' I'm going broke.
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    I have an Oregon grinder that I use for chains that get rocked. I learned to hand file and do that primarily but in never hurts to buzz them with the grinder to get things back in the ballpark relatively quickly and then "finish" with a hand file. Grinders are like everything else...a cheap one will give cheap results.
     
  10. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    I have to agree with you. Some guys have that knack, of doing a good job with a file, free hand, while others can't do it to save their own life. I for one, am that way, I can't sharpen with a file, free hand.
    Once my chain starts getting dull, I swap it out, with a sharp one, and keep on cutting. I do my chain sharpening, at the end of the day.
    I used to use an Oregon Filing Guide, for a lot of years, till I got my bench grinder, about 7 or 8 years ago. Never looked at a file ever since.
    Trick I learned is, not to put too much down preasure on the motor assembly, use gentle up and down movements, with the power head, with a little more down, with every pass, that way the cutter won't get too hot, and loose it's temper.
    Took me a few scrap chains (that didn't fit any of my chain saws, or were almost out of chain life), to practice with the grinder, to find that out.
    When I set up the grinder to do a chain, I slide the chain, till it touches the grinder wheel, with the power head pulled down, and then set the back stop, a little bit a head, and try a cutter.
    If I can feel, a slight wired edge, with the tip of my thumb nail, while sliding it along the length of the cutter, I know that the chain, is going to be sharp.
    My bench grinder is a Tecomec FL-136 (Jolly Bench Grinder), (wish I would have spent the extra $50.00, for the Super Jolly Bench Grinder, because of the automatic lock), but is still a good out fit.
    It is built, in the same factory, in Italy) as the Oregon grinders, and a bit cheaper as well, than the Oregon.
    One thing I did find, if I didn't clean my chains prior to sharpening, my grinding wheel would get gummed up, with oil, and saw dust, from the chain, and I'd have to do more dressing of the wheel.
    I toss them into a tub of oven cleaner, for about an hour or two, place them on a board, with a nail, use a scrub brush for doing vegetables, scrub them down, both sides with hot soapy water, rinse them in the hot soapy water, and in clean water
    Once they are dry, I sharpen them, and I dip them in bar oil, let them soak for a few minutes, and hang them up on a nail, to drip off the extra bar oil.
    As for time doing the sharpening, I can sharpen 8 20" chains, in an hour, as with the filing guide, I could do 4 20" chains in an hour, once I had everything set up, per chain, with both the filing guide, and the grinder.
    For doing the chain rakers, I have to do one side at a time. If I don't, I get uneven heights, from side to side. I do all my chain rakers, at 0.025".
    I put a straight edge, across two cutters, on the same side, measure with a feller gauge, and get the power head set at that height, do that side, and repeat the set up, for the other side of the chain. Hope this helps a bit. Bruce.
     

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