Chicken Manure based products for rotary spreaders?....Compost Topdressing Lite?

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by Exact Rototilling, Feb 2, 2011.

  1. starry night

    starry night LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,600

    So, dishboy, you apply organic input. Then there is abundant rain or irrigation, and there is the right temp THEREFORE mushrooms that appear are due to your organic input?
     
  2. dishboy

    dishboy LawnSite Platinum Member
    from zone 6
    Posts: 4,115

    Go re read my post. Is that what I said.
     
  3. starry night

    starry night LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,600

    I guess I'm not following. Could you rephrase what you said?
    (I'm not trying to be argumentative.)
     
  4. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    Well, that is true to a certain extent. In any event, now you see why I had a problem with the blanket statement from Marcos .... right? Just because you put something organic on your lawn does not necessarily lead to mushrooms. If that were the case, mulch mowing would also lead to mushrooms ..... correct?
     
  5. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    Like I posted earlier other variables are involved like soil type & porosity.
    Yes I would say EXTREME amounts of mulch created by mowing might trigger mushroom spawning, as would an excessive, decomposing thatch layer.
     
  6. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    Which was then followed by an inappropriate generic blanket statement. Seriously .... do you think it is beneficial for people to walk away from your post thinking they will get mushroom growth if they use organics on their lawn .... especially given it may or may not happen? That is what you said. Furthermore, can you explain how soil type and porosity contribute to mushroom growth which occurs on surface applied organic matter just so everyone is clear?

    How extreme? 1" blanket of clippings/thatch .... 2" ..... 3" ..... Let's be specific here for those people who just can't handle seeing mushrooms decomposing organic matter.

    Something to consider. I just recently applied a 3"+ layer of compost over a fairly large area ..... no mushrooms to speak of to date (nearly 2 months later) .... yet there were some scattered mushrooms colonies before I applied it. Now one might think if there were mushrooms before, then adding all that organic matter would result in a mushroom explosion ..... according to you .... and yet it didn't.
     
  7. starry night

    starry night LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,600

    Let's not lose sight of Exact Roto's original statement-- that he had a customer mention to him she once had mushroom growth from a chicken manure product. So we can assume he wants to know what to tell such a customer; that it's possible sometimes; that it's possible but rarely; if it does occur, his mowing will grind the mushrooms. ????? He wants to display some knowledge by giving an experienced response. So, those with experience with this, tell him what he might say.
     
  8. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,568

    How is Marcos statement, Yes, it's possible that chicken manure product may have spawned mushrooms, especially if it had been applied too heavily or unevenly in spots. Other factors involved include soil type(s) & soil porosity & precipitation.
    Potentially any organic-based product will result in mushroom outbreaks a few weeks later.
    "an inappropriate generic blanket statement" that says "adding all that organic matter would result in a mushroom explosion"?
     
  9. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    Read the last sentence of your Marcos quote and you tell me.
     
  10. dishboy

    dishboy LawnSite Platinum Member
    from zone 6
    Posts: 4,115

    I would think that composted organic material vs non composted/dehydrated chicken manure is going to yield different results as to mushrooms appearing in turf. It seems that mushroom growers are actually using manures as a growing medium or food for growing mushrooms. It may be that chicken manure is a very good fungal food. Knowing the climate of northern Idaho, mushrooms are not going to need a lot of encouragement and actually might be a sign of a healthier lawn.
     

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