Class 5 Trucks

Discussion in 'Trucks and Trailers' started by tyler_mott85, Feb 6, 2012.

  1. ParkWelding

    ParkWelding LawnSite Member
    Posts: 182

    Lugnuts or number of studs doesn't matter. You could have 6K or 7K axles with 5 lug UTG style hubs. You could have 8 lug 12"x2" drums on 5200# axles with 12"x2" brakes. You could have 8 lug wheels on 8K axles.
     
  2. GQLL

    GQLL LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 844

    The best way to find out your cdl requirements is to not listen to forums and contact your local dot office and get them to tell you what the requirement are.
     
  3. pitrack

    pitrack LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,049

    I was under the impression that as soon as your truck and trailer combined rating is over 26k you need a CDL.

    So basically federal laws say that as long as the truck is less than 26k you can ALSO pull a trailer up to 10k and still not need a CDL. But most of the time each state has a different law than federal when it comes to DOT correct?

    I would still think as soon as you hook up a trailer with two 5200# axles which has a rating of 10,400 to a truck with a rating of over 16k you would be over because the trailer being towed is NOT less than a 10k rating. Isn't that basically what the federal law is saying? So you need to find a trailer with exactly a 10k rating for that to work and nothing over that.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2012
  4. pitrack

    pitrack LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,049

    Probably the best post in this thread, the rules are different everywhere.
     
  5. ParkWelding

    ParkWelding LawnSite Member
    Posts: 182

    But most trailers with two 5200# axles are factory rated and tagged 9900#, 9990#, 10000# or something like that. So FEDERAL law says you can pull that with a truck 26K GVWR or less without a CDL.
     
  6. pitrack

    pitrack LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,049

    Got ya, then you gotta deal with State laws.
     
  7. Duffster

    Duffster LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 1,193

    Well your impression is wrong.

    Yes.

    I don't know of any state that varies from this.

    As I already pointed out that is astupid assumption.


    You don;t know what the rating is. Axle rating has NOTHING to do with GVWR.

    To hit 36k exactly without a CDL, yes.

    Sans CA there is next to no difference in CDL state to state.
     
  8. Duffster

    Duffster LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 1,193

    Ummmm. No.
     
  9. Duffster

    Duffster LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 1,193

    BTW. I have three trailers with a pair of 5200s under them. One is 10k GVWR, one is 12k GVWR and one is 14k GVWR.:waving:

    Trailers with a 10,400 GVWR are pretty rare.
     
  10. KS_Grasscutter

    KS_Grasscutter LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,331

    You would sound a heck of a lot less like an arrogant prick if you would type at least a whole sentence reply rather then your snappy two word answers.

    I was at first questioning the 26k thing, and you are correct, you are allowed more then 26k and not need a CDL if the tow vehicle is not over 26k and the trailer is not over 10k. If the trailer is over 10k, though, you need a Class A CDL, no matter what you are pulling it with.

    I'm not even gonna bother arguing my point anymore about the GAWR determining trailer GVWR, must be a Kansas only thing (and maybe Nebraska?) That or the person I heard it from was wrong (can't remember if it was a State Trooper or a trailer dealer).
     

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