Climbing systems

Discussion in 'Tree Climbing, Pruning, Felling' started by Guest, Nov 3, 2008.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    Any pictures have a pretty good idea in my head or at least I think I do but a pic. would help.

    Any other systems.

    Thanks,
    Mike
     
  2. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    Will be looking foward to see those. Glad to here work is moving strong there. It has been slow here in Sonoma County, we have some rain coming in but no wind so I don't think too much storm work will come about. It has been enough to pay the bills but barely.
     
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    I find that a simple DdRt is usually the simplest fastest way to get things done. I've learned several of the SRT techniques over the last few years and while they are very beneficial in certain situations, more often than not I can be up a tree and already working on a classic setup long before I'm even ready to climb on SRT. Its very gear intensive and therefore expensive plus you have that much more stuff to keep track of/ pack around. Keep in mind that I live in an area where our largest trees are just over 100' tall and I spend most days working in trees 50' and under. In areas where big trees are the every day norm I can see SRT being much more advantageous. But only as an access tool. Working off an SRT system is more hassle than its worth. A plain old DdRT system with an efficient smooth hitch ( I use a VT) is much faster and easier to work with.
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    I use a 7.6 mil static line for my climbing rig with a Petzl Ascension and GriGri, 2 points of contact and a footstrap, a Stihl 200T hanging from an old-skool saddle with leather buckstrap.
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    Thank you for the welcoming. I'm out of Maineville and Goshen (2 offices). Just a little outfit, but we do quite a bit of work.
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    Wyoming is a great mature village. Good trees out there. I got a little work directly related to the storm, but have been doing more removals that are still standing. It seems that our bids are too high not to have the risk factor involved. I'd much rather get that check anyways. I certainly THOUGHT I'd be slammed by the storm and have been buying a lot of gas for estimating. How about yourself?
     
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    You don't think? I am thinking that we are having to wait on the prune jobs that we would typically be doing right now (while the sap is low) and focusing on this mess. I am hoping that we can schedule the prune jobs for the winter months (while the sap is REAL low) and be working until Feb. or Mar.???
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest
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    Doesn't the sap go down the tree in the winter and raise back up the tree in spring. I have an old-skool Arborist on my team now (you may know Mike Anderson) who tells me that he love to prune in the winter because the tree comes back nice the next season with less sap damage.
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    "Sap Damage" was a poorly stated term. I hadn't a clue why Mike said that he like to prune in the winter, I just knew that he did. I don't do any cutting. I am just a business owner. I will get up there and cut when asked and I sell ALL the work, but I try not to be in the way too awful much. Landscaping is my forte.

    Bengals...who ARE dey?
     
  10. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Posts: 0

    I use split tails. Just easier when you need to constantly connect and disconnect from the tree to get your rope around different branches. I use a bee line single splice and I use blakes hitch. Easiest and can use it for ascending or descending. Sometimes I use double spliced bee line and I used the klemheist or any version of prusik knot. One safety snap, one carabiner(s. If you have the time though, I use the blakes hitch without the second carabiner, (SRT) just because I find when descending using DRT it twists my rope on the way down and I got to spend time unwinding it.
     

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