college study: aeration not breaking the barrier?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by GarPA, Feb 21, 2004.

  1. GarPA

    GarPA LawnSite Silver Member
    from PA
    Posts: 2,585

    Couple of years ago we had some discussion here about the study that was done and concluded that aeration does NOT break the chemical barrier as many people believe. I;d like to print off that study but I cant find it. I think it was done by an ag dept of a large college....Purdue sticks in my mind but I'm not sure. Some of you here have an elephant memory on old threads and thought you might be able to point me to it...thanks much
     
  2. turfsurfer

    turfsurfer LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 364

    Not sure of the exact study but I do know that right in the study material for the Ohio test it specifically states that aeration does not affect the barrier. Also confirmed by several of the extension guys from OSU. I think the soil conditions are more consistent and better in the spring than in the early fall when the ground is rock hard. Just have to watch that the ground is not "too" wet so you don't make a mess.
     
  3. Evan528

    Evan528 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,144

  4. hole in one lco

    hole in one lco LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,793

    aka rototill
     
  5. GarPA

    GarPA LawnSite Silver Member
    from PA
    Posts: 2,585

    thanks much Evan and guys...I tried a search on "barrier" but I must have missed it...it will be nice tohave copies of this becuase some local and natl chem companies keep spreading this crap that customers will have crabgrass all over their lawn if we aerate...more of their bs marketing hype
     
  6. GroundKprs

    GroundKprs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,969

    GarPA, the studies done 12-15 years ago showed that the barrier basically just dissolves back in place. However, it is not recommended to make aeration after pre-em application a regular practice. Your state turfgrass extension specialist would probably tell you the same thing.

    If you are aerating lawns treated by others, you would want to be careful on this. If there is a significant crabgrass breakthrough, you would definitely be blamed. It is best to aerate cool season lawns in the fall, at the beginning of their life cycle.

    I would only practice spring aeration after pre-em apps if there is some real problem that a spring aeration will help to correct.
     
  7. GarPA

    GarPA LawnSite Silver Member
    from PA
    Posts: 2,585

    Good point you make Jim. Most of our aerations are done in early fall but I do have some new customers who insist on spring aeration. Most of these new ones have lawns that are in such bad shape that the risks of breakthrough are worth taking, given the soil compaction..thanks for your perspective
     

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