Comment on rotor head placement.

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by dmc456, Oct 17, 2005.

  1. dmc456

    dmc456 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 384

    I have a fescue lawn w/ clay soil and want to install an irrigation system. The picture is my house with the proposed rotor placement. My turf is already very thick and dense so the irrigation will be used only a few times a year during drought (1 once a week max).

    The back is layed out with minimal heads and the front it textbook.

    I'm looking for input on the head placement mainly in the back. Will this work? If not, why?

    The front seems like overkill. Can I do the front like the back and remove heads?

    The areas not covered will have spray heads (not shown).

    Presentation1.jpg
     
  2. dmc456

    dmc456 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 384

    I added numbers for the heads for reference.

    Presentation1.jpg
     
  3. dmc456

    dmc456 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 384

    I haven't determined if I'm going to cover the sidewalks or use a seperate zone with spray head. I'm using city water so water marks on the concrete are not an issue (no rust etc...)
     
  4. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    Personally I don't think it'd work as a primary system. You'll have a lot of corners going thin since they'd be only receiving trace-end water from heads.
     
  5. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    You might want to add some sprinklers and bump a few in the lower section.

    Plot Plan Sprinklers.jpg
     
  6. jerryrwm

    jerryrwm LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,274

    Hayes,

    Gotta agree with the additional heads. In fact I would even add one more in the corner of the garage by the truck between heads 10 and 12. Use a smaller nozzle but get that corner watered. Two heads throwing into a corner at the end of their radius never get enough water into the corner. It costs a bit more at the outset, but you won't be sorry.

    The revised system will need maybe two more valves, but the application will provide even coverage, and actually keep the run times down. If the valves are added at installation it will prevent a lot of heartache later.

    Jerry
     
  7. dmc456

    dmc456 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 384

    Thanks for the input. That is how I originally had it designed, but it just looks like a ton of rotors with tons of overlap.
     
  8. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    It's not really that much overlap based on the way sprinklers deliver water. The closer to the head you are the more water is received until such a point at the end of the radius where there is only a trace amount. By designing head-to-head you eliminate "thin" areas of precipitation.

    You originally stated that these would only be used as backup for normal precipitation. We all know the weather can be finicky. If you're going to put it in I'd do it right from the start and then maybe not need it. BUT... if all Hades breaks loose you'll then be in a position of maintaining a gorgeous lawn while your neighbors' lawns pass away. :D
     
  9. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    You said it much better than I could. :p
     

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