Commercial Mowing Bid

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by midwestguy, Jan 11, 2005.

  1. midwestguy

    midwestguy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 8

    Commercial Mowing Bid
    Hello everyone. I have been getting a ton of great info from all of the members on this site and it is a great tool, especially if you are just starting in the business. I have been in the business going on 3 years now and we have grown from year to year. We are adding more commercial accounts this year. Anyways, I really need some ideas on how to bid our latest commercial account. It is a multi-apartment community on an old air force base. Many of the residential lawns are small, but they have huge commons areas behind the units, sort of like a huge courtyard. We went and picked up the bid packet today and it states that there is about 360 acres to be mowed. Any ideas on how to charge for this? The property manager also stated that the last LCO to mow for them had a 6 man crew and that it took them 2 complete days to mow and trim. I hope this is enough info to get some replies. Thanks everyone!
     
  2. rickman

    rickman LawnSite Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 29

    great question! Im wondering that too :waving:
     
  3. grass-scapes

    grass-scapes LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,552

    figure out what you want to make per hour, what your machine costs are per hour, labor costs per hour, materials needed (mulch, fert, etc) and all other costs. Then, multiply that times the number of hours it will take you. Dont forget a little extra for your profit. if you want to make 35 per hour, and then 5 other men at, say, 10 bucks an hour. Machine cost (depreciation) at 2 bucks per hour. material @ 300 per month (this is a guess). 16 hours. That comes to about 6300 per month, figuring 4.3 weeks per month. Now, thats just a guess, giving you an idea how to figure it. I use a spreadsheet to help me with my estimates. I tweak it all the time.
     
  4. bushtrimmer

    bushtrimmer LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 351

    Talk to the superintendant of the facility again and try to get more info. If it's been bid out before they might tell you what the range of past bids have been and might even tell you what they paid last year if you work it right. That would at least tell you if ur in the ballpark or not. It might give you a figure to wonder if you could do it for. Dig, dig, dig for info, it could only help!
     
  5. midwestguy

    midwestguy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 8

    thanks guys. every little bit of info helps. we plan on talking to the property manager in the coming weeks. I am very familiar with the property so I know the general range of yard sizes, but we will also be looking at the entire property and taking measurements of our own.
     
  6. midwestguy

    midwestguy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 8

     
  7. midwestguy

    midwestguy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 8

    Anybody else have an idea about how to go after this bid. Hourly is a good way, what about square footage of by the acre? This would be a nice bid to land, but would be a nightmare if underbid. Thanks all.
     
  8. Mudmower

    Mudmower LawnSite Member
    Posts: 102

    This would be a nice bid to land, but would be a nightmare if underbid



    This is what makes or breaks commercial bidding. I would work off of a STRICT hourly estimate. Number of workers x # of hours x cost per hour. I would fudge on the hi side.

    I just lost a bid for 275 acres for a county job. Guy's total bid came out to $27.00 dollars per acre. This was NOT straight cut mowing, and required a boom arm mower. I thought I had cut to the bone at a hair under $39.00 and acre. There is ALMOST no way he can make ANY money.

    Jim
     
  9. neversatisfiedj

    neversatisfiedj LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,028

    How did you get the information about the bid ?
     
  10. Mudmower

    Mudmower LawnSite Member
    Posts: 102

    Since it is County, the bids are public info. Go to the court house and start digging, you can find out all sorts of info for county and city jobs.

    Jim
     

Share This Page