Commerical Accounts

Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by ala588, May 26, 2006.

  1. ala588

    ala588 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 5

    I've been doing yard cutting part time off and on for the last 30 years. This year with my son being grown, we are working together to build a business. In our first five weeks we gained 85 customers (residential). And now have two commercial accounts. We want to get more into commercial accounts. I have a chance to submit a bid on an apartment complex, but I don't know how to write out a professional bid. Can anyone help me with this?
     
  2. WalkerMike98

    WalkerMike98 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 167

    If you picked up 85 accounts in five weeks you are way to cheap. Unless I am missing something.
     
  3. cessnasovereign

    cessnasovereign LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 292

    I'll second that! Personally I have a minimum of $30 regardless of lot size and when I do a bid I think to myself how many hours it will take and multiply each hour by AT LEAST $35 and there's the bid. :weightlifter:
     
  4. ala588

    ala588 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 5

    I average $25.00 to $250.00 per cutting, depending on the size. Alot of the large companies around here use a z-mower to cut a small yard with sod and ruin the yard. The customers I gained came from these other companies because we use push mowers. We will cut up to 1 acre with push mower. We started gaining business in bush trimming and redoing flower beds too. I'm about to bid on an Apt. complex. It takes four guys now about six hours to do the job. The one that is dropping the contract because of his other business said they get paid around $1200.00 per cutting. Does that sound about right? And when we sign a contract will that be for year round? What type of work will I do in the winter time for them to still get paid? And I started with a new commerical account about two weeks ago that wants to do a 5 to 10 year contract, will I be able to set a price increase in the contract to justify the gas prices? Thanks for all your help. Don
     
  5. AAELI

    AAELI LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 362

    Pricing seems fair to me. Check your costs before giving your proposal. There are a multitude of sources for contract samples even some put out by Sean Adams on the site. (pay for good ones) If there is no work in the winter= no pay. Either find out what needs to be done during that time or you're on a break without funds. Prices can be negotiated for most everything. If they are reasonable enough to understand the fuel fluctuating prices write the thing in otherwise it is all a gamble.
     

Share This Page