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Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by Kirkbride Lawn Care, Dec 29, 2011.

  1. PlantscapeSolutions

    PlantscapeSolutions LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,979

    Smell is really not an issue at all. The odor is not much different then the smell of fresh mulch or amended soil. There is no different danger from the microbes in the compost then there is from the soil in a flower bed. Studies have actually shown that compost contains a lot of different beneficial microbes that will suppress several types of pathogens that can be found in nature.
  2. Ticolawnllc

    Ticolawnllc LawnSite Senior Member
    from Wall NJ
    Posts: 411

    I'm sure you're talking about finished compost. The composting process can be a smelly one. When the farm by me starts to spread the fall leaves every on downwind knows it.
    I don't know much, but a grass pile that has been sitting in the sun cooking and then turned lets off a foul smell. (I use gypsum to fight the smell) Also if not allowed to reach ideal temperature the debris won't break down fully and unwanted bacteria can develop. One of the reasons temperature is so important is to kill the bad microbes and let the good one live.
    ThatÂ’s all I know.
  3. tyler_mott85

    tyler_mott85 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 582

    I imagine composting for profit is much like cutting firewood for profit. If you want to go for it and have it not really be a huge labor investment you have to go big and be as efficient as possible.

    Company around here is a big bulk compost supplier and they have huge machines to turn the rows over for them. Much like this one. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58vDhLhbVaA

    And probably to get the best compost you have to put the best mixture of material in and keep the moisture and temperature just right at all times. Sure, for the average homeowner just putting a bit of lawn clippings and food waste together makes the compost they need. But to get a consistent product like someone would want to purchase time and time again you would have to source some industrial sources for the material you choose. And just like fast food restaurants realizing that their used oil is worth money to them now who know what food scraps, etc go for.

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