Concerned about my Southern Oak

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by D8dozerboy, Oct 2, 2008.

  1. D8dozerboy

    D8dozerboy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 34

    Here are some pics. It has lichen, but a bit more then my other Oak. There are runners coming up on this one often and it has less leafs then the other as well. I only move in 4 month ago and have been deep watering the tree and did some trimming that is it. What should I be doing to help my trees along as far as fert ETC? Also what should I be doing with the bushes ETC by the house? I've learned a lot about grass from here, but not much on anything else. Looks worse in person some of the pics where after hurricane Ike so they're a little short on leafs.

    Thanks
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  2. mngrassguy

    mngrassguy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,167

    Get rid of the flag stone sitting on the roots first. Next, pull the mulch back about 3" away from the base of the trees.

    Now is the time for a root feeding. Ross root feeders works better than spikes but the best thing to do would be to hire a pro. Ross Feeders hook onto your hose which might give you 80lbs pressure. Our equipment forces fertilizer around the root zone with 250-350lbs of pressure. Spikes can "burn" the roots where they go in but are better than nothing. Good luck.
     
  3. joshua

    joshua LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,226

    it looks like you have collar rot, but it could just be how the picture is.call a arborist to clean up your pruning, to fert it, and to check it for root & collar rot.
     
  4. D8dozerboy

    D8dozerboy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 34

    Thanks I want to learn to that care of my yard myself. I don't believe it is collar rot the darker area is how high the mulch use to be on the trees trunk, but I'm do some more reading on it. If ya'll have any links to sites or threads that have some good info I would appreciate them.
     
  5. jkingrph

    jkingrph LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 807

    Lichens on tree trunks down here are the rule more than the exception so I would not worry about, nor would I worry about the mulch or stone rings. Do not overwater tree amd when you do use soaker hose just beyond drip line to encourage root spread. Water deep and infrequently to promote deep roots. Oaks of most varieties are one of the easiest trees to start and care for here as they are native.
     
  6. joshua

    joshua LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,226

    if your looking to do it yourself, then 3 keys for oak and general maintenance, oaks like iron, i would in the spring fert. the landscape with multi-cote ( spelling ) it feeds for 9 months, buy a book that you can learn the proper way to prune, and remove the tree on the left in the first picture something is seriously wrong with it. i think its either collar or root rot, for it to get suckers like it has obviously somthing is not right and its not a large tree yet. i would bet its planter to deep causing the root or collar rot or both.
     
  7. Newt*

    Newt* LawnSite Member
    Posts: 182

    D8dozerboy, Congratulations on your new home! The best way to learn how to properly prune your trees might be to invest in a certified arborist. You can read up on how to properly prune trees, especially your southern live oaks aka Quercus virginiana and then watch how and where they prune. Be sure to ask questions so you can do the follow-up. These trees need proper pruning in order to develop a strong branch structure. I see limbs growing straight up that need to be removed as well as improper pruning cuts. There also appears to be branches crossing that will rub. Proper angles at the intersection of the trunk and branch is very important with these trees. This site has some great info on these trees including a pruning schedule for optimum growth.
    http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/trees/QUEVIRA.pdf

    Here's how to properly prune a tree.
    http://na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/howtos/ht_prune/htprune.pdf
    http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/woody/pruning/index.htm

    It appears the rootflare of your trees is buried and needs to be exposed.
    http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/woody/rootcollarexam.html

    More helpful root info.
    http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/woody/roots.html


    I agree that the stones should be removed. Fertilizing trees isn't generally recommended these days without a soil test or specific knowledge of nutrient deficiencies. You can read the most recent info on fertilizing here.
    http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/woody/masterindex.html#F

    I can't tell what your shrubs are from the pics, but they will probably have to be pruned at some point so they stay in bounds and don't block the windows and entance. Do you know what they are or have you seen them bloom? You might find this site helpful, but id of what they are would be best. You can click on any lettering in green for photos.
    http://www.ca.uky.edu/agc/pubs/ho/ho59/ho59.htm

    Newt
     
  8. D8dozerboy

    D8dozerboy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 34

    Thank you newt
     
  9. Newt*

    Newt* LawnSite Member
    Posts: 182

    D8dozerboy, you are very welcome! Try and get an id on your shrubs. If they bloom, take pics of the flowers and post them on a forum for id so you'll know what they are and how to care for and prune them.

    Newt
     
  10. KACYDS

    KACYDS LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 559

    D8dozerboy,

    Looking at your pictures, the two trees are Live Oak tree, the bigger shrubs along the house is Ligustrums, the smaller shrubs are Boxwoods, and the three grassy looking plants are Liriope. Hopefully this helps.

    Also looking at your lawn, looks like you might have chinch bugs. Do you know if its St Augustine grass? If you can get a close up picture, maybe I can help you identify it.
     

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