Concrete bases

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by Frick, Jul 11, 2007.

  1. Frick

    Frick LawnSite Member
    Posts: 36

    I have a project that has a concrete base, but brick faces were mortered to the concrete.


    The brick facers are starting to crumble


    Would it be possible to get all of the loose brick off, and put pavers over the top. Assuming that I put 1" of sand down, would the brick pavers disentigrating destroy the pavers eventually? The concrete pad itself is fine and there are no drainage issues? Is this feasible?
  2. ChampionLS

    ChampionLS LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,066

    That would work if you could remove all the brick. Good Luck there.
  3. hoskm01

    hoskm01 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,690

    If you can get to smooth and level concrete, you wont need to sand.
  4. Frick

    Frick LawnSite Member
    Posts: 36

    What if I can't remove all of the pavers? It looks like they were glued down, some of them come of easily, others just disentigrate. Plus when some of the pavers come up, they leave the glue residue behind, which wouldn't be a smooth base to lay the pavers on.

    The bricks are disentegrating at a fairly quick rate. If I sweep all of the loose chips off, I'll have more in a couple of days.

    My biggest issue is the uneven surface with small children. The bricks are disentigrating at a fast rate. If I can't get a smooth surface by taking off the brick pavers, is my only option to take out the concrete slab?
  5. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    If you can't get a smooth surface, you have a few options:
    1. Remove the concrete and lay pavers with an appropriate base
    2. If no cracks and you are just dealing with mortar, you can always grind the concrete back smooth. Chances are, if you do this you'll wish that you'd done #1
    3. You can overpour the concrete that is there with new concrete and eliminate the step out of the door. I don't really recommend overpouring, especially if the existing slab is cracked/cracking though.
    4. This would probably be your last option as I see it: lay down a good geotextile fabric, then compact gravel over that and lay pavers on a sand setting bed. You would have to eliminate the step out of the door, unless you forgo the aggregate and simply screeded sand.

    If the concrete is not in good shape, and cost is an issue, I would strongly consider tearing out the concrete and re-pouring a new slab. Unless you really want pavers, then I would tear out the old slab and compact in a proper base...

    Where in N. IN are you?
  6. Frick

    Frick LawnSite Member
    Posts: 36

    I'm in Elkhart.

    The concrete base is in good condition. According to the neighbors it's about 7-8 years old (sometimes it's nice to have older nosey neighbors.)

    My biggest concern is putting in something that isn't disintegrating and being a hazard to the kids. The bricks are about 3/8" thick, I'm not sure who or why they were put in, I moved in about 9 months ago so I'm just stuck with the problem.

    If I got the majority of the brick face off and all the way around the edges would it be possible to screed sand in the middle and mortar/glue the edge pieces in? I would plan on back filling around the edges and grading for a nice easy fall.

    I'm hesitant to take out the concrete as I know that I have some irrigation lines that run under it and I'm not sure what else. I'm just afraid of getting starting in the demo of the pad and finding out that it is significantly deeper than 3-4 inches that I think it is. I've taken out a patio once before and it was over 12" deep in some spots.
  7. ChampionLS

    ChampionLS LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,066

    I'd remove whatever you can. What doesn't remove easily, take a sledge hammer and whack them off. If theres adhesive left, no big deal. You'll definitely need to screed sand over the existing surface before laying new pavers. If the main slab has a crack in it, you'll need to cover it with Geotextile first, then lay your sand. No need to remove the slab if it's intact.
  8. forestfireguy

    forestfireguy LawnSite Senior Member
    from nj
    Posts: 601

    Rent a terrazzo machine, they are used to grind concrete off to get it to a certain height, often used on large commercial pours if a height was overshot somehow.

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